1905 Historical Sketch of Chicago’s Confectionery Trade

Biographical Data Extractions

ABBS, Albert E.
ABBS, Mrs. Albert E., member of the Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners
Association when first formed March 1, 1905 (Group Photo Page 78, text 125)
Bought out wagon jobbers business of Henry MEISTERLING May 1, 1894
President, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, “…is a very successful jobber with a
large trade outside of Chicago; a member of the firm of A. E. ABBS & CO.; has been a
delegate fro Chicago to the National Association and is chairman of (the) Banquet
Committee. He is prominent, in church circles, being deacon of the Ada Street M. E.
Church.” 1905
Ad: “A.. E. ABBS & CO. (Photos of A. E. ABBS and R. MARUGG) 30 Park Avenue “Jobbers of all
kinds of Fine Confectionery, Your wants and orders will be promptly attended to.”
Page 30 (Photo), 35 (Photo/Ad), 51, 78 (Mrs. ABBS Group Photo), 93, 125, 187

ADAMS’
Licorice, Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum
Page 68 (Ad)

ADAMSON, Axel S.
Started jobbing this year (1893)
Still on the road 1905
“…with good reputation as a jobber”
Ad: “A. S. ADAMSON Dealer in Fine Candies 329 West Ohio St.”
page 107, 182 (Ad)

AHLER, J.
Ad: “J. AHLER Wholesale Confectioner 231 W. 14th St.”
Page 182 (Ad)

ALBERDING, Charles A.
ALBERDING, L. C.
TRIMBLE & ALBERDING at 191 and 193 South Desplaines Street entered manufacturing in late 1886
Charles A. ALBERDING joins firm which becomes L.C. ALBERDING & BRO. 1887
Page 81

ALEXANDER, H.
H. ALEXANDER & CO. started at 14 State Street on January 1
“…began selling candies at a very low figure, had circulars distributed all over Chicago and suburbs and did so much business that they failed” and were succeeded M. NATHAN & CO.
Page 41

ALLEGRETTI, Benedetto
(See also ALLEGRETTI BROS. – only “G.” mentioned, but brothers could include Benedetto and
Frank)
BENEDETTO ALLEGRETTI CO. began manufacturing at 213 Randolph in 1902
Page 119

ALLEGRETTI BROS.
(See also Benedetto and Frank ALLEGRETTI — BROS. unnamed except for “G.” below, but could include these two?)
131 Wabash
Began manufacturing 1896
Brothers separated 1897, one staying at 129 Wabash under the name of the ALLEGRETTI CHOCOLATE CREAM CO., and opened a new store at 159 State
ALLEGRETTI CHOCOLATE CREAM CO. gave up store at 129 Wabash, but kept store at 159 State.
899
G. ALLEGRETTI started a new house known as ALLEGRETTI & CO. AT 179 State 1897
G. ALLEGRETTI partnered with I.A. RUBEL and B. F. RUBEL and changed company name from
ALLEGRETTI & CO. to ALLEGRETTI & RUBEL 1899
RUBEL & ALLEGRETTI opened a wholesale department at 53 Lake Street 1901
Page 111, 113. 115, 119
ALLEGRETTI, Frank
(See also ALLEGRETTI BROS. — Only ALLEGRETTI named is “G.”, but brothers might include
Benedetto and Frank)
Began wholesale and manufacturing business at 192 Grand Avenue 1901
Page 119

ALLEN, J. W.
Ad: “Established 1881 J. W. ALLEN & CO., Manufacturers and Jobbers of Supplies and Machinery, for Bakers, Confectioners, Soda Dispensers, Ice Cream Manufacturers, Hotels,
Caterers, Etc.,
208-210 Washington Blvd., Chicago”
Page 178 (Ad)

ALLER, Pinkus
(See also ALLER, Robel, could be father/son?)
Jobber who began late 1880’s and remained in business to 1903
Page 81

ALLER, Robel
(See also ALLER, Pinkus, could be father/son?)
Jobber who was succeeded by his son (1890’s?)
Page 79

AMBROSIA CHOCOLATE COMPANY
Began manufacturing at 3333 State Street in 1898
Moved to 42 and 44 Michigan Avenue 1900
331-333-335 Fifth Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1905
Ad: “Buster Brown Chocolate wafers, chocolate nonpareils in boxes, pails, and barrells.
Send for samplsa and quotations to AMBROSIA CHOCOLATE CO.”
Page 106 , 115, 117

AMERICAN BADGE COMPANY
119 Madison St., Chicago
Ad: “AMERICAN BADGE COMPANY, 119 Madison St. Chicago, Badges, Buttons, Banners,
Advertising, Novelties.”
Page 186 (Ad)

AMERICAN CANDY COMPANY
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Ad: “AMERICAN CANDY COMPANY Manufacturers of High Grade Chocolates, Milwaukee, Wisconsin”
Page 131 (Ad)

AMERICAN CARAMEL COMPANY
Ad: “AMERICAN CARAMEL COMPANY, Makers of Dependable Sellers in Confectionery (10 types
listed), Factories located at York, Pa., Lancaster, Pa., Philadelphia, Pa.”
Page 174 (Ad)

AMERICAN CHOCOLATE CONFECTION CO.
Ad: “Specialties — Fine chocolates, pail goods, penny goods — ZENITH — Always the same
the Jobbers’ Favorites — AMERICAN CHOCOLATE CONFECTION COMPANY – 123-125 La Salle Ave,
Chicago”
Page 20 (Ad)

AMERICAN CHOCOLATE COMPANY
Bought out COSTELLO’S CHOCOLATES from P. J. COSTELLO at 161-165 South Jefferson Street
1901
Page 95

AMERICAN CHOCOLATE CREAM CO.
Began manufacturing at 161 South Jefferson in 1902
Page 119

ANDERSON, Francis
“located for a few years at 166 North Clark Street”
Page 25

ARVOLDT, O.
Began jobbing business in November 1, 1903
Sold out to L. Olson March 1, 1904
Page 123, 125

The AUSTIN CANDY KITCHEN
Ad: “The AUSTIN CANDY KITCHEN, W. N. SHIELDS, Prop., Manufacturer and Retailer of
Everything in Candies, 117 North Park Avenue”
Page 170 (Ad)

BACCIGALUPI
PUZZO & BACCIGALUPI
Began manufacturing cocoanut goods on Chicago Avenue near Wells Street
Burned out in Great Fire
Resumed and did some business until 1873
Page 47

BACHMAN, Moses
268 South Clinton 1891
Began manufacturing at 263 South Desplaines1898
Page 95, 115

BACKMAN, S.
Manufactured at 211 South Water Street until 1877
Went out of business 1877
Page 53

BAIR, Ira B.
Ad: “IRA B. BAIR, Manufacturer of high grade HAVANA CIGARS, Wholesale and Retail, No. 7
South Campbell Avenue”
Page 186 (Ad)

BANZHAFF, Charles
North Water Street 1846
Continues in business until he evidently retired 1850
Working as a clerk for E. FRANKENTHAL, a dealer in cigars and tobacco at 62 Clark Street
1852-1853
Bought out John EISENBEIS and restarted own candy business at 90 Wells Street 1853
Retired 1857
Page 11

BARBIERY, Louis
Canal Street between Washington & Randolph St. 1854
Page 12-13

BARRETT, M. L.
Employed by P. L. GARRITY as bookkeeper at 39 Randolph Street 1866
Page 19

BARRETT, William
Began jobbing business in 1898
Sold out
Page 115

BARROWS, D. A. & Co.
1847
Bought out business of William HOSSACK 147 Lake Street east of and close to Clark Street
prior to 1843
Remained in business for a year or more when he gave it up and moved to Galena, Illinois,
where he died
Page 11

BARTHOLOMAE, F.
Bought route from Ira A. BILHARZ to begin jobbing business at 7046 Parnell Avenue in 1902
Page 121

BARTLES, Fred H.
Began jobbing candies and did a large business, which however, did not seem to be a paying
one. 1893
He remained for about three years at it 1896
Is now in the grocery business 1905
Page 107

BAUM
FRYE, KLEINBECK & BAUM
195 Michigan Avenue
One of new houses that started business “this year” (1890’s?)
Page 95

BAUMAN
WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO.
Cleveland, Ohio
Ad: “We are the originators and makers of the only GENUINE ITALIAN CREAM on the market.
Flavors: Vanila, Chocolate, Orange, Peach Also the original PRINCESS KISS, A most delicious
piece of molasses candy. We also make Creameata Nut Nougat and Vanila and Chocolate Walnut
block. BEWARE OF IMITATIONS! Attempts have been and are being made to imitate our goods.
Our goods are still unequaled. The WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO. Cleveland, Ohio.”
Page 139 (Ad)

BAUMEISTER, Eli A.
Began jobbing in late 1880’s
Sold out to O. W. LOERCKE 1899
Page 85

BEATTIE, John B.
BEATTIE, Mrs. John B., first 2nd Vice President, Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners Association when formed March 1, 1905 (Group Photo Page 78, text Page 7, 125)
Bought out J. Harvey HATHAWAY’S jobbing business December 1, 1893
“Took a prominent part in the (jobbing) business, having served on almost every important
committee in the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association. He is a strong opponent of unfair
measures, has been President of the body and is the only man not elected as a
representative who was sent by the local association to the national body.”
Ad: “J. B. BEATTIE, 2485 W. Monroe St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 78 (Group Photo), 99, 105, 125, 170 (Ad)

BEECH, Sidney F.
Ad: GARDEN CITY FIREWORKS, Ripper Crackers, Torpedoes, Flags, Balloons, Lanterns, Etc.
Manufactured by: Consolidated Fireworks Co of America, 30 and 32 So. Water St. Chicago,
Chicago Branch Mngr. Sidney F. BEECH, Mgr. Write for catalog and prices”
Page 142 (Ad).

BEECHER, Wesley
(See also BEECHLER, Wesley — could be the same man?)
“Frank PEOPLES ran a wagon for a few months for Wesley BEECHER and in the fall of 1863 went
into business for himself.”
Page 25

BEECHLER, Wesley
(See also BEECHER, Wesley — could be the same man?)
Started manufacturing at 132 Dearborn Street March 1863 – October 9, 1871 (Fire)
Went into tobacco business
Page 25

BEILFUSS
SEVERINGHAUS & BEILFUSS CO., INC.
Printers, Linotypers, Book Binders and Stationers
448 Milwaukee Ave
566-568 Ogden Ave.
Chicago
Page 72 (Ad)

BELL, Jonas N.
Started jobbing and is now (1905) a manufacturer of sweets at 606 West Madison Street
As Senior Partner began manufacturing as BELL & PFEIFFER at 40 Fifth Avenue and 612 West
Madison 1901
Has also manufactured vending machines
Ex-Vice President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Ad: (Photo of BELL) “JONAS N. BELL Manufacturer and Jobber of High Grade Confections, Sole
manufacturer of the Original “Mexican Penochis” as made in Old Mexico, Tin Boxes 25 cents.
Texas Pecan Clusters made of Texas Selected Pecan Nuts, Tin Boxes 30 cents, 604 W. Madison
Street — Chicago”
Page 83, 119, 122 (Ad/Photo)

BENDA, J.
BENDA & HYNOUS
Bought out jobbing business of W. M. URBANEK (also spelled URBANCK) in March 1902
Do a large business at 1186 Spaulding Avenue 1905
On the Entertainment Committee of the National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Convention
Ad: “BENDA & HYNOUS 1184 South Spaulding Avenue, We are the SPECIALTY men you are looking
for. Have you seen our Penny BUTTON & BADGE PRIZE — The greatest seller on the market.
We also have new candy by the carloads. Drop us a Postal and be convinced.”
Page 53, 99, 119, 146 (Ad)

BENNING, H. J.
Succeeded William PETERSON as a jobber April 5, 1894
Still in business 1905
Resides at: 363 Orchard Street
Page 107

BENRIGHTER, F.
Sold jobbing business at 4730 State Street to George FOX in September 1902
Page 121.

BERG, John V. (Mrs.)
Daughter of John C. NEEMES
Page 31

BERKEL, John
Began in jobbing business April 1905
Ad: “JOHN BERKEL, 270 Hudson Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 125, 155 (Ad)

BERRY, John (father)
BERRY, S. (son)
BERRY’S
Employed by W. B. BRAZLETON & Co.
Began manufacturing at 241 West Madison Street
Opened factory at at Washington Boulevard and Sangamon Street and added new store at 957
West Madison Street 1886
Had stores in “almost every section of Chicago”
Had candy department at the Fair
Added ice cream business
“Added three stores to his string” — main stores located at 148 and 201 State Street and
155 Madison Street and factory located at northeast corner of Sangamon Street and
Washington Blvd. (1892)
On death of John BERRY, business managed by son, S. BERRY
Manufactory moved to large new building 232 and 236 West Congress Street west of Morgan May
1, 1905
Employed William Leimert as foreman of new factory 1905
Ad: “BERRY’S Berry’s famous specialties, renowned for their purity, sold to jobbers.
Genuine chocolate Dipped Nougat. Full Cream Chocolate Dipped Caramels, 200. Molasses Taffy
in pans or bars,. Full Cream Caramels, in pans or 5# boxes. Peanut Brittle in 10 cent
pkg. And 3# and 5# boxes. Try a sample case of our goods. New Factory 232-34-36 W.
Congress Street, Chicago.”
Page 28 (Ad), 31, 59, 81, 95

BETZ, Michael
Bought wagon and route from H. E. SCHAEFER, 353 West Huron Street, and began jobbing
business at 3258 Lowe Avenue March 7, 1904
Still in business 1905
Ad: “M. BETZ 3258 Lowe Ave. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 123, 155 (Ad)

BIDNA, O. N.
Began jobbing business at 181 South Leavitt Street on November 6, 1903
Ad: “O.N. BIDNA 181 S. Leavitt St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 123, 178 (Ad)

BILHARZ, Ira A.
(Note: called J. A. BILHARZ on page 109)
Bought out jobbing business of C. N. FIELD August 1, 1900
Sold route to F. BARTHOLOMAE September 1902
7201 Harvard Avenue
Page 109, 117, 121

BLACK, W. H.
Started as manufacturer 1895
77 Van Buren Street
Page 67

BLAHA, V. C.
Bought out William MEISTERLING’S jobbing business at 2386 Cornelia Street August 5, 1903
Member of the Entertainment Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Ad: “V. C. BLAHA, 2386 Cornelia Street. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 123, 134 (Ad)

BLITZ, Louis
Began the manufacture of prize specialties September 1894
Still in the business 1905
Page 111

BLOCK, John
Partnered with Charles A. SCHUMACHER under firm name of CHARLES A. SCHUMACHER & CO. to
manufacture candy at 623 Center Ave. January 15, 1888
Moved to Eighteenth and Halsted Streets
Partnership dissolved with SCHUMACHER’S retirement in 1892
Began jobbing business until his death
F.C. TORMOEHLEN ran the business for BLOCK’S widow finally purchasing it several years
later
Page 87, 97, 117

BLOME, George
Ad: “GILT EDGE trade mark — Penny goods, French Mixtures, Lozenges, A. B. Gum work, Hard
Boiled Candy and Fine Chocolates — We sell to jobbers only — The Geo. BLOME & SON CO,
Baltimore, Maryland”
Page 151 (Ad)

BLOOMINGTON CARAMEL COMPANY
Bloomington, Illinois
Ad: “In purchasing look for the Label “Royal Bloomington Confections” It is the sign of a
quick seller and a repeater. Remember “The Good Eating Kind.”
Page 131 (Ad)

BOBLIT, A. N.
Ad: “A. N. BOBLIT, Carpenter and Builder, Store and Office Fixtures, General Jobbing, 172
E. Van Buren Street, Telephone Harrison 584″
Page 114 (Ad)

BOFINGER, R.
Began jobbing business April 27, 1897
Resides at; 3601 Fifth Avenue 1905
Ad: “R. BOFINGER, 3601 5th Avenue, Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 113, 155 (Ad)

BOISIN, Peter
Began jobbing business at 1035 North Rockwell Street May 1903
Ad: “Peter BOISIN Wholesale Confectioner 1035 N. Rockwell St.”
Page 123, 135

BOLES
BOLES & KEHOE
Began manufacturing candies at 71 State Street and still in business 1905
Main business to supply the retail trade
Page 69

BOLGER, F. F.
Bought out route from J. M. CASE September and sold to George HAWKES 1887
Page 75, 85

BOLGER, Thos. J.
Vice President of stock company formed under the name of M. E. PAGE Confectionery Company.
August 18, 1890
Stock company failed and went out of business August 18, 1897
Page 33

BOLZ, Charles
Began jobbing in 1894
Sold out in 1902
Page 107

BOOSE, George
Bought jobber business of Peter CONLEY which had been a large one but had gradually
decreased due to Mr. CONLEY’S sickness and death May 1893
Bought jobber business of A. Conklin June 2, 1893
Still in business 1905
Resides at 5623 South Elizabeth Street 1905
Page 59, 77, 103

BORDEN’S CONDENSED MILK CO.
Caramel Department New York
GOLD MEDAL St. Louis 1904
Page 56 (Ad)

BOWDEN, John H.
Began as wagon jobber in 1872
Sold out to H. YOUNKER August 13, 1874
Page 51

BOWER, E.
Began manufacturing at 27 North Clark 1854
Page 13

BOWERS, Benjamin
Jobber who sold out in 1885
Page 79

BOWMAN, Jesse B.
Began manufacturing candy 45 Wells Street 1854
Page 13

BOYNTON, Cal
Employed by F. W. RUECKHEIM and brother Louis (F. W. RUECKHEIM & BRO.) 1875
“…an expert in inventing new and salable confections.”
Page 49

BRACH, E. J.
Employed by BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR
Began own business as jobber
President of DREIBUS-HEIM Co. 1891
Restarted own business at 227 North Avenue February 1, 1905
Officer of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Page 75, 77

BRANDENBURG, Charles
Recording Secretary, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, past representative to the
national organization, and filled position of sergeant at arms for several terms, “…has the
confidence of the members of the Chicago J. C. A.” 1905
Bought out jobbing business of August LEUSCH August 1, 1892
Still in business 1905
Ad: “C. BRANDENBURG, 721 August St. Wholesale confectioner”
Resides at 721 Augusta Street
Page 42 (Photo), page 63, 95, 99, 155 (Ad). 187

BRAUN
HABICHT BRAUN & CO.
Ad: “New York – Chicago, HABICHT BRAUN & CO. Importers, Manufacturers and Dealers in Raw
Material , Everything to Manufacture Good Candies”
Page 96

BRAVERMAN, Barney
Built up a jobbing business in connection with his retail trade, starting in April (1891?)
Ad: “BARNEY BRAVERMAN, Jobbers of Fine Confections, 592 W. Taylor Street”
Page 103, 114 (Ad)

BRAZLETON, W. B.
W. B. BRAZLETON & CO.
Employed John BERRY
Page 59

BRILEY, W. J.
Began jobbing business at 416 West Fifty-first Place in May 1903
Member of the Amusement Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Ad: “W. J. BRILEY, 416 W. 51st Place, Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 123 155 (Ad)

BROOKS, George H.
Originally a wholesale grocer and made considerable money in that business
Partnered with Charles SCHAFER in CHAS. SCHAFER & SONS at 158 Monroe Street 1858
Retires in less than a year.
Buys out Francis W. HICKMAN becomes SASSAMAN & BROOKS at 178 State Street 1859-61
Opens own business at 77 Randolph Street 1861-1863
Bought out C. W. SANFORD, deceased, of C.W. SANDORD & Co. and changed to BROOKS &
NEEMES 1870-79
Partnered with Louis F. HAEHNLEN in BROOKS & HAEHNLEN at corner of Michigan Ave. and Lake
Street January 1, 1879
BROOKS & HAEHNLEN moved to 9, 11, 13, and 15 River Street 1882
Employed Richard J. KNAPP
Bought out HAEHNLEN’S interest and renamed firm “GEO. H. BROOKS CO.” 1885
Resumed manufacturing candies at 21 River Street, but didn’t remain long in business due to
poor health (l
1886
Page 13, 15, 17, 21, 29, 31, 63, 77

BROOKSBANK BROS.
Ad: “BROOKSBANK BROS. Manufacturers of Carriages and Wagons, Robey St. & Ogden Av.,
Chicago, Repairing and Painting a Specialty”
Page 159 (Ad)

BROWN, John
Began jobbing business 1900
Ad: “JOHN BROWN 6002 Sangamon St. Wholesale confectioner”
Page 119, 155 (Ad)

BROWNING, Frederick
Described as one of “the parties who were interested in and who were stockholders” involved
in controversial sale by George V. FRYE “under execution” of the FRYE CARAMEL COMPANY at
207 Illinois Street to the OATMAN BROTHERS (E. J. OATMAN and F. G. OATMAN) which resulted
in “considerable litigation.” January 18, 1897
Page 89

BRUGGEMEYER, Albert E.
BRUGGEMEYER, Mrs. Albert E., first President Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners Association when formed March 1, 1905(Group Photo Page 78, text 125)
Bought out jobbing business of Henry ENGELN soon after 1893
“At once took a prominent position in the jobbing business and has been Vice President of
the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, a delegate to the National Association, and is
Chairman of the Finance Committee for the national convention.”
Wholesale confectionery business at 128 W. Adams Street 1905
Chairman Finance Committee, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Ad: “The most successful jobber in Chicago. Why? Because the profit in your business ion
the goods you SELL not on the goods you BUY. Therefore you should call on A. E.
BRUGGEMEYER Importer and Distributor of the Fastest Selling PENNY GOODS in the Country. I
carry a large stock of Staple Goods and chocolates. My wagon makes regular trip and would
like to call on you when you want something to Boom Your Business. Write or call at 128 W.
Adams Street, Chicago.”
Page 12 (Photo/Ad), 58 (Photo), 78 (Mrs. BRUGGEMEYER Group Photo), 105, 107, 125

BRUMMER, Robert
Began jobbing business 1894
Sold out in 1896
Page 107

BUCHHOLZ
BUCHHOLZ BROS. & SCHULZ
Partnered with Julius H. SCHULZ
Not long in business
Page 55

BUGLER
BUGLER & GOBEL
Began manufacturing at 56 North Jefferson in 1902
Page 119

BUNTE, Albert
BUNTE, Gustavus
BUNTE, Ferdinand
BUNTE BROS. & SCHULZ
Partnered with Charles A. SPOEHR as BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR at 416 State Street 1876
Principal business selling to wagon jobbers, and had two wagons of their own driven by
Michael KOPP and Adam SCHOTT
Firm dissolved 1877
Brothers went to work for Kranz.
Albert and Gustavus BUNTE partnered with Julius H. Schulz at 184 Indiana Street May 1,
1879
Did a large business, but dissolved when BUNTE brothers entered into new partnership with
SPOEHR and moved to 83 Market Street Fall 1880
Moved to 73 and 74 West Monroe Street 1885
Joined by brother Ferdinand (former foreman for John KRANZ) March 1885
Employed Edward H. SCANLAN to head city sales 1888
Employed about 200 hands 1896
Albert withdraws and partners with George FRANK at southeast corner of Fifth Avenue and
Jackson Street as ALBERT BUNTE & CO. 1885/6
ALBERT BUNTE & CO. changes name to BUNTE, FRANK & CO. and moves to La Salle and Ontario
Streets 1886/7
Albert BUNTE withdraws from BUNTE, FRANK & CO., goes to work for John KRANZ as foreman
where he still works in 1905
Ad: (Five pages) “BUNTE, SPOEHR & CO., CHICAGO, The leading confectioners — Just a Word
with you, please: We are such unassuming people we fear our modesty has prevented us from
proclaiming to the public, what our customers have known for many years, the fact that our
goods have been the standard of excellence for more than a quarter of a century. That old
adage, “by their work ye shall know them” seemed to be sufficient in former years, but in
these busy days, if we expect to retain the reputation we have held so long, and guarded so
jealously, we must not only make the best Goods, but must let the Dealer and Consumer know
that we are doing so. Lest we weary you, we will speak briefly, not of ourselves, but of a
few of our Candies that have not only helped to establish the reputation of which we are so
proud, but have aided Chicago in achieving the distinction of being the Great Candy Center.
(followed by three pages of candy descriptions) Always look for the Trade mark, and if it
is on the box you will know you are getting the best…..BUNTE, SPOEHR & CO. 139 and 141 West
Monroe St., Chicago. (Trademark is white “B. S. & Co.” inside a black box, inside a black-
outlined white circle.
Page 53, 55, 81, 200-205 (Ad)

BURNHAM, A. B.
SMITH-BURNHAM CO. with Richard Smith to produce butterscotch at 193 South Desplaines on
March 1, 1890
Partnership dissolves and company renamed BURHAM BROS. 193 South Desplaines 1892
Eventually failed
A. B. BURNHAM started a wagon, which he sold to William Hagemeister Feb. 1, 1905
Page 87, 95

BUTLER, J. F.
Began a jobbing business in February 1, 1901
Resides at 1989 Gladys Avenue 1905
Member of the Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and the
Entertainment Committee of the National Convention
Ad: “J. F. BUTLER, 1989 Gladys Ave., Wholesale Confectioners”
Page 119, 155 (Ad)

CACHARES & CO.
Began manufacturing at 4516 State 1900
Page 117

CALLAWAY, W. L.
Chancellor Commander, Knights of Pythias
Ad: “VAN BUREN Lodge No. 531. Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall — N. W. Corner Madison St.,
and California Ave., Chicago. Regular Conventions every Wednesday evening at eight o’clock;
Rank Work first three conventions of each month. Visitors cordially invited. W. L.
CALLAWAY, Chancellor Commander. W. L. CHRYSTAL, K. of R. & S.”
Page 114 (Ad)

CAMERON, J. W.
Ran a wagon for a number of years, but sold to Henry MESTERLING July 30, 1893
In partnership with MARBACH bought out T. H. JENSON at 171 and 173 South Desplaines
creating CAMERON & MARBACH May 1, 1904
Tore down building and relocated to 102 and 104 West Adams Street (formerly owned by Arthur
STEIN) where they have floor space of about 10,000 square feet May 1, 1905
Ad: “CAMERON & MARBACH, Successors to T. H. JENSEN, Manufacturing Confectioners, 102-104 W.
Adams Street, Chicago, Italian Cream and Cocoanut Specialties, Fine Sherbert Penny Goods,
Manufacturers of the well known “MILLS BRAND” Salted Peanuts”
Page 32 (Ad), 91,123

CAMPBELL, James
Began in jobbing business in 1902
Page 121

CAMPBELL, R. J.
Manufactured candy at the southwest corner of Lake and Paulina Streets 1860’s
“Did a very fair business”
Employed Lawrence E. LENT (May 1, 1868 – May 1, 1872) and Frank FERNEOUGH as city salesmen
Died 1875
Business bought out by Frank FERNEOUGH in 1876
Page 37, 39, 53

CANDY, Robert
(see also Thomas and Sydney CANDY, brothers)
Started business at 644 West Lake Street May 1, 1870
Joined by brothers, Thomas and Sydney, 1872
Robert and Sydney move to Columbus, Ohio 1873 where still in business 1905
Branch in St Louis, Mo.
Page 47

CANDY, Sydney
(see also Thomas and Robert CANDY, brothers)
Partnered with brothers, Robert and Sydney CANDY, in firm called CANDY BROTHERS 1872
Robert and Sydney moved to Columbus, Ohio, where they continued candy business 1873
Page 47

CANDY, Thomas
(see also Robert and Thomas CANDY, brothers)
Partnered with brothers, Robert and Sydney CANDY, in firm called CANDY BROTHERS 1872
Robert and Sydney moved to Columbus, Ohio, where they continued candy business 1873
Thomas moved to 136 Twenty-sixth Street manufacturing tablets, buttercups and cough drops
exclusively 1873
Firm name changed from CANDY BROTHERS to THOMAS CANDY 1893
Moved to 57 North Washtenaw Avenue 1893
Moved to 1522 West Lake Street 1894
Retired 1895
Page 47, 99

CAPP, M.
“M. CAPP, formerly city salesman for F. W. RUECKHEIM & BRO., entered the jobbing field
early in the year, and sold out to William J. Stadter (Note: spelled STATTER on page 97) in
March, 1892, going into the jobbing business at Racine, Wisconsin , where he has been quite
successful.”
Page 79, 97

CARLI, Paul
South Water Street near Wells Street 1839
Gave up business and moved from city
Page 11

CARLISLE, W. D.
Bought jobbing business from Gust HILDEBRANDT 1894
Page 107

CARR
DAVIE & CARR
Began manufacturing specialties at 298 North Wells Street, burned out, resumed for a few
months in 1872
Page 43

CARSON
CARSON, PIRIE & CO. purchases lease for building at southeast corner of Aberdeen and
Madison Street, paying Robert H. FISH a bonus of $2500 Winter of 1870
Page 33

CASE, J. Merton
Began new business — the selling out of candy wagons and routes — “this year” (late
1880’s?)
“His method was to sell a few times to stores, so that he could claim that he had done some
business with them, and advertise to sell out his horse, wagon and route, having a new
wagon built to be ready to start again just as soon as he got a customer for the one he was
running. Mr. Case made quite a profit in this way and sold out a great many routes,
extending over several years. It got to be so well known to every confectioner in the
business, manufacturers, jobbers and retailers that it was not an easy mater for him to
sell out, as dealers informed the would-be purchasers what they were buying. Of the many
routes he sold out but three buyers are now in business — L. PELLES, Joseph B. HELLMAN
and John L. DICKHAUT .” 1905
Sold a jobbing confectionery route to Joseph B. HELLMAN October 1885
Sold out to F. F. BOLGER and abandoned the business and went on the stage in 1895
Page 67, 75, 79

CAYZER CONFECTIONERY Co.
Began manufacturing at 101 Kinzie Street 1900
Page 117

CHALMERS, Wm.
Partnered with Louis F. HAEHNLEN in L.F. HAEHNLEN & COMPANY (manufacturing and wholesale)
at 42 South Water 1876-1877
Sold out to Wm. R. Stevens 1877
Page 21

CHAPMAN, T. W.
Sold out jobbing business to W. E. MULLARKEY March 1905
Page 125

CHAPPELL, R. W.
119 Randolph Street (manufacturing with C. L. SHEPHERD) aft. 1854
Page 13

CHARLES
GEORGE & CHARLES
Succeeded to business of the TORMOEHLEN & BROS. moving it to 108 and 110 West Adams Street
Sold out to The NATIONAL CANDY CO.
Page 43

CHESTED
Employed Adolph GEORG at 31 North Clark Street (post 1864)
Page 37

CHICAGO CANDY COMPANY
Began manufacturing at 169 South Desplaines 1899
Began manufacturing at 236 Fulton Street 1902
Page 115. 119

CHRYSTAL, W. L.
K. of R. & S., Knights of Pythias
Ad: “VAN BUREN Lodge No. 531. Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall — N. W. Corner Madison St.,
and California Ave., Chicago. Regular Conventions every Wednesday evening at eight o’clock;
Rank Work first three conventions of each month. Visitors cordially invited. W. L.
CALLAWAY, Chancellor Commander. W. L. CHRYSTAL, K. of R. & S.”
Page 114

CLAY, E. C.
E. C. CLAY & CO. began manufacturing at 148 State Street 1899
Page 115

COBB, A. S.
Began manufacturing at 373 Fifth Avenue 1901
Page 119

COBLENS, Zacariah
Louisville, Kentucky
First Guard of newly formed National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association August 1895
Page 93

COHEN, Henry A.
Began as jobber 1886
He “…has been, in turn, a jobber, manufacturer, salesman on the road, solicitor jobber,
manufacturer, jobber, workman, clerk, jobber, and is now a salesman, or was; but it is not
an easy matter to locate him. Mr. Cohen has at different times made great efforts to
capture the city trade by offering big inducements to purchasers, but so far has not made a
marked success.”
Page 81

COLBURN, Levi J.
Bought out interest of Michael SCANLAN and partnered with Edward and John F. SCANLAN in
SCANLAN BROS. & COLBURN at 138 South Water Street 1869
Edward SCANLAN retires and, partnered only with John F. SCANLAN, firm becomes SCANLAN &
COLBURN 1870
Bought out John F. SCANLAN at 78 State Street and firm becomes L. J. COLBURN & CO. 1871
Remains at 78 State Street until burned out October 9, 1871
Opens factory at 128 North May Street 1871
Opens retail store at 638 West Lake Street 1871
Moved to 67 Randolph Street 1874-1876
Retired 1876
Page 17

COLE, B. M.
COLE, Mrs. B. M., first Sergeant at Arms, Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners
Association when formed March 1, 1905 (Group Photo page 78, text 125)
Bought jobbing business from Frank HUNT on a transfer of card from Robert SPEAR November
1902
On Badge Committee of the National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association Convention 1905
Ad: “B. M. COLE Jobbing Confectioner 3554 Cottage Grove Ave.”
3554 Cottage Grove Avenue
Page 78 (Mrs. Cole in Group Photo), 121, 125, 135 (Ad)

COLEMAN, John E. (Mrs.)
Daughter of John C. NEEMES
Page 31

COLLINS, Archibald
Began jobbing business at 8757 Escanaba Avenue January 7 1903
Ad: “A. COLLINS Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Confectionery, Stationery and School Store
Supplies, All kinds of school books. 8957 Escanaba Ave.”
Page 121, 142 (Ad)

CONFECTIONERS’ AND BAKERS’ SUPPLY CO.
Began manufacturing at 52 and 54 Wabash Avenue in 1886
Moved to 272 Madison Street sharing space with I.F. DICKSON who became member of firm
Bought out DICKSON 1899
Moved to 218-220 East Washington Street in 1902 where still located in 1905
AD: “New Machinery Handy Tools, convenient utensils, first quality supplies for
confectioners and ice cream makers. Our catalog will show you. 218 & 220 Washington Street,
Chicago”
Page 81, 85, 88 (Ad)

CONFECTIONERS’ JOURNAL
Ad: “Subscription price, @2.00 a year; single copies 25 cents, 130 pages each month,
Confectioners Journal, The oldest paper of its class in the world; Established 1874 Devoted
exclusively to the interest of the confectionery baker; Associate member of the National
Confectioners’ Association; A monthly review of all the news of the trade, pure food
legislation, modern practices, practical recipes, latest inventions, new ideas and
profitable information invaluable to every manufacturing wholesale and retail confectioner.
Note: A sample copy sent free to confectioners mentioning this ad. Confectioners’ Journal
— 627 Walnut Street, Philadelphia”
Page 138 (Ad)

CONKLIN, A.
Bought jobbers business of William H. DIBBLE 1883
Sold to George BOOSE June 2, 1893
Sold out to Charles MATT 1884
Repurchased the route 1885
Sold out to F. C. WITTMAN June 2, 1890
(Note on page 91, “WITTMAN” is spelled “WHITMAN”)
Page 69, 77

CONLEY, Peter
CONLEY BROS.
Began manufacturing candies at 15 North Clark Street April 1875 – 1877
Peter Conley ran a wagon and continued business as a jobber
A leading jobber at time of death
Business sold to George BOOSE by which time his formerly large business had gradually
decreased due to his sickness and eventual death 1893
Page 59, 103

CONRATHS, Peter
CONRATHS & THULIN jobbing business created in 1882
Soon acquired entirely by CONRATHS
Left business
Bought August FICK March 1, 1903
Still jobbing 1905
Residence: 345 East Twenty-fourth Street 1905
Page 75, 89

CONSOLIDATED CANDY COMPANY
Started at 840 West Van Buren Street 1896
See “STEVENS, George H.”
Page 111

CONSOLIDATED FIREWORKS CO.
Ad: GARDEN CITY FIREWORKS, Ripper Crackers, Torpedoes, Flags, Balloons, Lanterns, Etc.
Manufactured by: CONSOLIDATED FIREWORKS CO. OF AMERICA, 30 and 32 So. Water St. Chicago,
Chicago Branch Mngr. Sidney F. BEECH, Mgr. Write for catalog and prices”
Page 142 (Ad).

Co-Operative Flint Glass Co., Ltd.
Manufacturers of: Tablet Jars, Tin Top Jars, French Jars, Ring Jars, Toy Mugs, Individual
Salts, Cake Covers, Cake Stands, Oblongs, etc. etc. — Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania”
Page 163 (Ad)

CORNELIUS, Edward H.
Wholesale Confectioner
“Dropped into the jobbing trade on October 30” 1893
Like it so well remained at it 1905
“…is a strong opponent of short count and short weight goods and has at times taken a very
prominent part in jobbing affairs, having held the offices of sergeant at arms and
President in the local association (of Jobbing Confectioners) and first Vice President in
the National Association.
Resides at: 226 Vilas Place 1905
Page 80 (Ad), 105

CORNWELL CANDY COMPANY
Ad: “SCHRAFFT’S — A Man and A Woman Judge a man by his cigars, a woman by her
confectionery.. Refined women insist on SCHRAFFT’S chocolate bon bons. There is something
peculiarly delicate “melting,” satisfying about them. SCHRAFFT on every chocolate.
CORNWELL CANDY COMPANY, Distributors. Branch House Second & Walnut Streets, St. Louis, Mo.
Main Offices and Factory, 49 & 51 South Union Street, Chicago, Ill.”
Page 143 (Ad)

COSTELLO, P. J.
Came to Chicago and started a small candy business at 197 Michigan Street, where he made
Costello’s chocolates famous (1890’s?)
COSTELLO CHOCOLATE COMPANY moved to larger quarters at 161-165 South Jefferson Street.1900
Sold business to the AMERICAN CHOCOLATE COMPANY 1901
Died leaving wife and five children April 1903
Page 95, 117

COUMBE, Luther
Bought a wagon from George SAUMWEBER 1894
Page 109

CRATTY, Josiah
President of stock company formed under the name of M. E. PAGE Confectionery Company.
August 18, 1890
Stock company failed and went out of business August 18, 1897
Page 33

CRICKARD, Nick
Partnered with J. B. HENNIGAN in HENNIGAN & CRICKARD at 193 Water Street 1862
Assumed ownership and changed name to N. CRICKARD & CO. (no partner) 1866
Martin DAWSON bookkeeper for firm 1866
Died 1868
Page 23

CULVER, Fred Gould
City salesman for HUTCHINSON & JAMISON
Formed partnership with Frank DIBBLE as F. G. CULVER & CO.
When that dissolved, started own business April 1, 1884
Ad: “FRED GOULD CULVER, 953 Sawyer Avenue, Jobbing Confectioner” 1905
Served on Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and elected officer
Page 69,114 (Ad)

CURETON, Albert
CURETON, Mrs. Albert, first Treasurer of the Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners Association when first formed March 1, 1905 (Group Photo Page 78, text 125)
Brother of William H. CURETON
Born Schnectady, New York, Feb. 7, 1851
Employed by James C. SIMM July 1863
Later employed by C. W. BRACKETT
Engaged in other pursuits 1864
Opened home-made candy business at 114 West Huron Street and started out a wagon 1870
Formed partnership with brother, William H. CURETON, called CURETON BROS. Sept. 30, 1872
Firm dissolved June 7, 1875
Started another business at 683 West Lake Street June 7, 1875
Moved to 353 West Madison Street May 1, 1877
Went out of business May 1, 1878
Employed by John Kranz as a city salesman June 1, 1878 – October 1, 1880
Purchased horse and wagon and went back into business for himself
Began manufacturing candy again at 613 West Lake Street September 1887
Moved to 128 West Lake Street October 5, 1891
Moved to 128 West Van Buren Street October 5, 1801
Moved to 559 Ogden Avenue dropping candy making and focusing only on wagon trade July 1,
1893
Employed Frank PILGRIM Fall 1888 – 1893
Sold wagon on December 1, 1895
Embarked on prize and specialty business at 967 W. Polk Street where still located in 1905
President of Confectionery Agents’ Association
An incorporator, first Vice President, and President of the Jobbing Confectioners’
Association
Organizer, First Secretary, Chairman of the Entertainment Committee, Member of the
Transportation and Finance Committees of the National Convention of the National Jobbing
Confectioners’ Association
First Recording Secretary of the Confectioners’ Agents’ Union 1880
“Albert Cureton organized an association in Cincinnati, another in Pittsburg, another in
Louisville, and delegates from each city met at the Palmer House, Chicago, on August 3, 4,
and 5, 1895, and organized a national body…” of Jobbing Confectioners. CURETON was
Secretary of the new national organization.
Ad: “Albert Cureton, Manufacturer of Prizes and Specialties in Confectioner, 967 W. Polk
St., Chicago. If you have not had my goods, a postal card will bring them, or a circular
describing my entire line. Wherever possible will be pleased to call you with samples of
prizes that are always sellers. The best line of penny prizes in the market.”
Page 8 (Ad), 37, 45, 62 (Photo), 73. 78 (Mrs. CURETON Group Photo), 93, 125

CURETON, John B.
Began jobbing “this year?” and continued until November 1, 1893
Sold business to W. M. URBANCK November 1, 1893
Died July 10, 1901
Page 53, 99
CURETON, William H.
Brother of Albert CURETON
Manufactured home-made candies June until partnering with brother, Albert CURETON –
September 30, 1872
Firm known as CURETON BROS. dissolved June 7, 1875
Remained in jobbing business until Jan.1, 1888
Running a U.S. mail route in Mammoth, Arizona 1905
Page 45

DAPLAIN, T.
Employed by Joseph DINET 1849-50
Page 11

DAVIE
DAVIE & CARR
Began manufacturing specialties at 298 North Wells Street, burned out, resumed for a few
months in 1872
Page 43

DAVIS, Robert E.
Began manufacturing at 255 South Western Avenue in 1904
Page 123

DAVIS, Stanley W.
Secretary of stock company formed under the name of M. E. PAGE Confectionery Company.
August 18, 1890
Stock company failed and went out of business August 18, 1897
Page 33

DAWSON, Martin
Born in Ireland 1845
Emigrated with parents to Chicago 1852
Bookkeeper for N. CRICKARD & Co.1866
Assumed ownership of N. CRICKARD & Co. on N. CRICKARD’S death 1868
Partnered with M. Shields in DAWSON & SHIELDS at 17 Clark Street 1868-October 9, 1871
(Fire)
DAWSON & SHIELDS employed Frank DIBBLE
Moved to 83 South Green Street 1871
229 Randolph Street 1873-1875
43 and 45 State Street until partnership dissolved 1875 – 1878
28 Lake Street 1878
211 State Street 1879 – October 1883
214 and 216 East Kinzie Street October 1883
Changed name to MARTIN DAWSON & CO. 1889
Incorporated as MARTIN DAWSON CO. and moved to 1520 State Street 1895
Onetime secretary of the National Confectioners’ Association
Page 23, 51

DEAN’S
Ask you jobber for Mentholated cough drops
Page 88 (Ad)

DEBUS, Henry
Began wholesale and manufacturing business at 85 Fifth Avenue 1893
Page 99

DEJMEK, Hynek J.
1193 South Spaulding Avenue
Began in jobbing business June 1904
Ad: “Hynek J. DEJMEK, Wholesale Confectioner, 1130 Turner Ave., Cor. 24th St”
Page 125, 178 (Ad)

DE PUE, D. S.
Began jobbing business in 1894
Page 109

DEWEY, A. J.
Began jobbing business in 1903
Ad: “A. J. DEWEY, Wholesale Jobbing Confectioner, Fine Chocolates a Specialty, Latest Penny
Goods, 2024 W. Monroe Street”
Page 123, 178 (Ad)

DEXHEIMER, George E.
Bought out jobbing business of R. E. TROWBRIDGE in September 1904
Page 125

DEYOUNG, Henry
Started in “jobbing” business with a wagon in 1869 – 1878
Sold out to O. JOOST 1878
Page 39

DIBBLE, Frank
Employed as city salesman by DAWSON & SHIELDS
Went into business for self and ran a wagon until 1882
Took charge of jobbing department of Frank FIELD & CO.
Took charge of jobbing department of SMITH & HALE 1883
On the road as a traveling salesman 1905
Page 51

DIBBLE, William H.
Began 1880
Sold out to A. CONKLIN 1883
Page 69

DICKHAUT, John L.
Purchased jobbers route from J. Merton CASE on March 13, 1884
Still in business 1905
Prominent in politics
Residence: 625 South Kedzie Avenue (1905)
Page 67, 78

DICKSON, I. F.
Former employee of M. E. PAGE & CO.
Began to manufacture candy of a fine grade at 272 Madison Street June 1, 1887
Continued in business until 1890.
Shared space with Confectioners’ and Bakers’ Supply Company at 272 Madison Street 1890
Began manufacturing as DICKSON CANDY CO. 1897
Joined Confectioners’ and Bakers’ Supply Co. while continuing candy manufacturing as
DICKSON CANDY COMPANY until 1899
Sold out to Confectioners’ and Bakers’ Supply Company 1899
Began as dealer in confectionery, confectioners’ machinery and tools under the name of I.
F. DICKSON at 100 Lake Street in 1899
Page 85, 113, 117

DIETRICH, Frank
Started in wholesale and manufacturing of confectionery January 1, 1893
Sold out 1897
Page 99

DIETZ, Edward
Jobber who sold out in 1888
Page 79

DINET, Joseph
Opened candy factory at 48 Clark Street 1846
“Dinet must have done quite a business for so small a city, for he had in his employ T.
DAPLAIN, Henry KINSON and P. KLEINTGES.”
Dropped out of the business in 1851
Page 11

DIRR, C. A.
Ad: “C. A. DIRR, Printer, 389 Ogden Avenue”
Page 135 (Ad)

DODD, Frank P.
Began jobbing in August and remained at it until 1875
Page 37

DONIAN, Samuel
Began manufacturing at 122 South Desplaines in 1903
Page 123

DOST, Theodore
Began jobbing business in 1903
Page 123

DOWST BROS. & CO
Began manufacturing confectioners’ prize goods at 24 to 30 South Clinton Street 1899
Ad: “Confectioners’ Novelties, New Goods Every Week, For Penny Goods, Prizes & Gum
Manufacturers, DOWST BROS. Co., 9, 11, & 13 Ann St., Chicago”
Page 117, 178 (Ad)

DRECHSLER, Andrew
Jobbing business corner of Milwaukee avenue and Reuben Street (in 1905 called Ashland Ave.)
1859
“…was the first man to run an independent wagon”
Page 25

DREIBUS, Anton C.
In toy business with SCHWEITZER & BEER
Successful jobber of candies until selling out to move to Omaha 1884
Went to Omaha with Michael and Jacob KOPP and formed firm of KOPP, DREIBUS & CO.
Partnership ended 1888
First Financial Secretary of the Confectioners’ Agents’ Union 1880
Page 57, 69, 73

DREIBUS, Herman
DREIBUS, Philip J.
Herman and Philip DREIBUS began in jobber business 1883
Philip DREIBUS sold out to Fred T. SEELIG March 1890
Page 77, 93

DREIBUS, John G.
Began jobbing candies in October (late 1890’s?)
Was temporary Secretary of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Sold out jobbing business to Frank GLEMBOW August 1, 1891
Organized DREIBUS-HEIM CO., manufacturers of confectionery, at 194 South Desplaines Street
Moved firm to larger quarters at 143 and 145 South Clinton Street 1895
Moved to present quarters (1905) 110 and 112 South Jefferson Street with floor space of
11,000 feet 1899
Specialize in chocolates and bonbons.
Ad: “DREIBUS-HEIM COMPANY, Manufacturing Confectioners, 110-112 S. Jefferson St., Chicago.
Our Specialties: (lists 10 specialties)”
Officers of company are: E. J. Brach, President; A. F. Steger, Vice-President, J. G.
Dreibus, Secretary; F. H. A. Straus, Treasurer, 1905
Page 77, 79, 100-101 (Ad)

DWYRE, Michael
In Jobbing business until he went into the grocery business from May 1866 – May 1872
Page 39

DYBALL, R. W.
Dealer in fruits and candies wholesale and retail
Started in candy business at 150 South Halsted Street 1872
Moved to 278 West Madison Street 1873
Moved to 193 West Madison Street 1879
Retired 1883
Went to Omaha and entered into business with PYCKE BROS. as PYCKE BROS & DYBALL
Page 53

EARL, T. L.
Began jobbing business in September 1888
Still engaged in business 1905
Ad: “T. L. EARL, 2060 Monroe St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 87, 134

ECKSTEIN
Partnered with F. W. and Louis RUECKHEIM (brothers) and became RUECKHEIM BROS. & ECKSTEIN
1899
Erected mammoth new factory at northwest corner of Peoria and Harrison 1904
Ad: “Though many seek to imitate, With style and name of close relate, The taste is what
all others lack– It’s only found in “Cracker Jack.” RUECKHEIM BROS. & ECKSTEIN Cracker
Jack and Candy Makers, Chicago, USA. A full line of staple goods, chocolates, penny goods
and pail specialties — Write for samples and prizes.”
Page 24 (Ad), 49, 51, 121, 123

EDELSTEIN, Jacob S.
Began manufacturing at 232 South Desplaines in 1904
Page 123

EDMISTON, J. R.
Began wholesale and manufacturing concern at 126 South Halsted and 248, 354 and 306 West
Madison
1892
Page 95

EGAN, M. F.
Began jobbing confectionery November 15, 1893
Has been an officer of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and is now a member of the
Entertainment Committee of the national convention 1905
Ad: “M.F. EGAN Wholesale dealer in Confectionery 5751 Aberdeen St.”
Page 105, 135 (Ad)

EHEIM, Louis
Began in jobbing business in May (late 1890’s?)
Sold out to William MEISTERLING March 1, 1893
Sold out to Harry L. WEISBAUM 1894
Bought back business from Harry L. WEISBAUM 1895
Page 77, 109

EISENBIS, John
Confectionery business at 90 Wells Street 1849 – 1855
Sold out to Charles BANZHAFF 1855
Page 11

ELLIAS, M.
Began manufacturing at 394 North Avenue 1899
Page 115

ELSTON, Wm.
37 Clark Street 1849
Page 11

ENGELN, Henry
Had been salesman for Albert CURETON and W. N. SHIELDS
Went into business for himself 1893
Shortly after sold out to Albert E. BRUGGEMEYER
Page 105

ENGLERT, Charles G.
Bought out jobber business from Christian F. THAUER November 16, 1893
Member of the Entertainment Committee of the National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
convention 1905
Prominent in social affairs
Ad: “CHARLES G. ENGLERT Jobbing Confectioner 217 Wells St.”
Resides at: 217 Wells Street 1905
Page 77, 105, 135 (Ad)

ENRIGHT, John W.
FREDERICKSON & ENRIGHT
With partner Charles FREDERICKSON began manufacturing at 15 North Clark Street
Next year FREDERICKSON withdrew from firm
ENRIGHT dropped manufacturing and went into jobbing business and still is in 1905
Ad: “J. W. ENRIGHT 285 N. Lincoln St. Wholesale Confectioners”
Page 53, 182 (Ad)

EVANS, George O.
Bought out Det Stevens in jobbing business upon his death in 1889
Sold jobbing business to John PETERSEN September 1899
Page 87, 117

EYRE, Robert T.
Began jobbing business in June 1894
Sold out business 1900
Went into jobbing business in Sterling, Illinois 1900 where still in business 1905
Page 109
FANTER, E.
Began in jobbing business 1894
Sergeant at Arms of Jobbing Confectionery Association
Page 111

FARLEY, J. K.
Began J. K. FARLEY MFG. CO. as a wholesale and manufacturing concern at 223 Michigan Street
November 15, 1891
Moved to 161 South Jefferson where they did large wagon trade in 1892
Moved to 102 and 106 Indiana Street 1896
Moved to larger and more commodious quarters at 118 to 130 East Superior Street 1901
Plant at 104 East Indiana absorbed by NATIONAL CANDY COMPANY in 1903
Now known as the J. K. FARLEY FACTORY of the NATIONAL CANDY COMPANY 1905
Page 95, 97, 121

FAYETTE, Albert Sr.
FAYETTE, Mrs. A. (Group Photo of Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners
Association Page 78)
FAYETTE, Charles and Albert Jr. (Sons)
Born Albany, Wisconsin 1849
Soldier in Civil War
Employed by L. F. HAEHNLEN as city saleman from end of War until January 1, 1869
Went into business for himself 1869
First President of Confectionery Agents’ Union
First President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and incorporator
First Vice President of National Association
Treasurer of Chicago Association for several years
Died 1899
Succeeded by sons, Charles F. and Albert who are still in business (in 1905) and, “like
their father take an interest in association matters.”
Page 26 (Photo), 39, 73, 78 (Mrs. A. Photo), Page 93

FAYETTE, Albert Jr.
219 Oakley Blvd.
Ad: “GIBSON, SYKES and FOWLER, McVICKER’S THEATRE BLDG. “The Five “Live Wires” of the
Jobbing Confectioners of Chicago” Give us your orders for standard and up to date
confections” (each of the five gentlemen are identified by name and address: A. THOMPSON
7041 Union Ave., H. G. GUEST 11919 S. Halsted St., Albert FAYETTE 219 Oakley Blvd., H. H.
KINNE, 248 S. St. Louis Ave., Wm. WEIS, 43 Surrey Ct.)
Page 102 (Ad/Photo of “The Five “Live Wires””)

FAYETTE, Charles E. (son of FAYETTE, Albert Sr.)
(Note: Middle initial is F. on page 39 and E. in Ad on page 159)
Ad: “C. E. FAYETTE 962 W. Madison St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 39, 159 (Ad)

FERGUSON, George W.
Bought out jobbing business of Henry HERSCHENROEDER on Oct. 12, 1887
Still in jobbing business 1905
Member of entertainment committee of the convention (Jobbing Confectioners’ Association)
Resides at 3619 South Seeley Avenue 1905
Page 83, 85

FERNALD, Paul
Partnered with RUECKHEIM & BRO. 1898
Retired 1899
Page 51

FERNEKES, J.
FERNEKES, D. J.
J. FERNEKES & SON
Pioneer Manufacturing Confectioners
290 East Water Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Page 72 (Ad)

FERNEOUGH, Frank
Employed by R. J. CAMPBELL as city salesman for business at corner of Lake and Paulina
Streets (before 1875)
Bought out R. J. CAMPBELL upon the latter’s death in 1876 and continued until 1894
Went into another line of business
Page 37, 53

FERRY, Charles S.
167 Lake Street 1846
Short-lived in business, lasting less than a year
Page 11

FESSENDEN, H. P.
Began jobbing business in 1894
Sold out in 1896
Page 107

FICK, F. August
Began jobbing business 1894
Was a jobber of candies from November 1889 – March 1, 1903
Sold out to Peter CONTRATHS and retired March 1, 1903
Page 75, 89, 109

FIELD, C. N.
Quit jobbing bakery goods, which he’d done for several years, to try jobbing candies
June1 1894
1229 Thirteenth Street
Sold out to J. A. BILHARZ August 1, 1900
Page 109, 117

FIELD, Frank
Came to Chicago from Peoria in 1878
Partnered with B. F. SMITH and Herbert WILLEY in opening bakery and candy factory under
name of FRANK FIELD & CO at 108 West Washington Street .
Moved to 203 East Van Buren Street, corner of Franklin Street dropping bakery business 1880
Employed Frank Dibble after 1882
Company went into hands of a receiver and sold to SMITH & HALE 1883
Went to St. Louis as foreman for O. H. PECKHAM & CO.
Remained in that position until death about 1895
Page 51, 63, 65

FINLEY, William (“Buffalo Bill”)
“one of the noted men among jobbers…has adopted a far western style of dress and manner of
wearing his hair and beard, and on account of his odd ways, has a fair trade”
Began jobbers trade in late 1880’s
Page 81

FISH, Robert H.
Started as manufacturer of candies at 275 Randolph Street 1864
Moved to 257 W. Randolph May 1, 1865
Moved to 325 W. Randolph where he carried on both a wholesale and retail trade and
manufactured ice cream for the trade 1867
Employed Lawrence E. LENT from Spring 1865 to May 1, 1868
Purchased building at southeast corner of Aberdeen and Madison streets Fall 1870
Employed M. L. ROBERTS as jobber
New Building at 304 Madison September 1871 – May 1, 1879
Moved to 530 West Madison Street 1879 – 1883
New building at 528 Madison Street 1883
“During his connection with the trade, Mr. Fish was known as a good business man and
manufacturer of fine goods. He was one of the first manufacturers in the trade to put
wagons on the street and at one time had quite a large and profitable trade.”
Retired in 1898
Age 76 in 1905
Page 18 (Photo), 33, 35, 39, 57

FLESHER, E. R.
Ad: “E. R. FLESHER, 6851 Yale Ave., Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 155 (Ad)

FOWLER & RORABACK
Confectionery Manufacturers
Succeeded by FOWLER & STEIN at 102 West Adams in 1903
FOWLER & STEIN succeeded by ARTHUR STEIN & CO. at 102 and 104 West Adams Street 1904
Page 121, 123

FOX, George
Bought out jobbing business of F. BENRIGHTER at 4730 State Street 1902
Ad: ” GEO. FOX 4730 State St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 121, 159 (Ad)

FRANK, George
Partners with Albert BUNTE as ALBERT BUNTE & CO. at southeast corner of Fifth Avenue and
Jackson Street 1885
Changed name to BUNTE, FRANK & CO. and moved factory to La Salle and Ontario Streets
Dissolved partnership and changed name to GEORGE FRANK & CO. (“still doing business at the
old stand) 1886 – 1905
“On October 8, 1890, George Frank called a meting of manufacturers and jobbers at 106
Randolph Street and this meeting was well attended. Another organization here sprang into
existence called the Confectionery Salesman’s Association, which was afterwards
incorporated as the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association on March 10, 1901.”
Ad: Includes photo of medallions called “Purity” and “Excellence”, ink drawing of FRANK CO.
Building, magnet “trademark” and text that reads: GEORGE FRANK & CO. Manufacturing
Confectioners, We manufacture a full line of Staple, and finest line of Penny Goods in
Chicago. Ask for Magnet brand — It means increased trade for you. Do not fail to put in
a stock of Estrella chocolates, bitter sweets, pure fruit flavors, 129-131 La Salle Ave.,
Chicago, Illinois.”
Page 55, 57, 93, 111, 118 (Ad)

FRANKENTHAL, E.
A dealer in cigars and tobacco at 62 Clark Street where he employed Charles BANZHAFF as a
clerk 1852
Page 11

FREDERICKSON, Charles
FREDERICKSON & ENRIGHT
With partner John W. ENRIGHT began manufacturing at 15 North Clark Street late 1870’s
Next year FREDERICKSON withdrew from firm
ENRIGHT dropped manufacturing and went into jobbing business and still is in 1905
Page 53

FREIDMAN, L
(See also L. FRIEDMAN as spelled in Ad on page 182)
Began jobbing candies Sept 1, 1891
Still in business 1905
Ad: “L. FRIEDMAN 313 N. Robey St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at: 313 North Robey Street
Page 95, 182 (Ad)

FREITAG, Carl
Cook County constable
Jobber for confectionery business for several years (perhaps late 1800’s?)
Eventually devoted his entire time to politics
Page 63

FRIEDMAN, L
(See also L. FREIDMAN as spelled on page 95)
Began jobbing candies Sept 1, 1891
Still in business 1905
Ad: “L. FRIEDMAN 313 N. Robey St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at: 313 North Robey Street
Page 95, 182 (Ad)

FRIEDMAN, S. L.
Having been a manufacturer, began jobbing candies in September 1893
S. L. FRIEDMAN & CO. began manufacturing at 130 Orleans in 1902
Is again jobbing 1905
Resides at 185 North Halsted Street
Page 105, 119

FRITSCH
FRITSCH & WILLIAMS
209 North Wells Street
Page 67

FRYE
FRYE, KLEINBECK AND BAUM
195 Michigan Avenue
One of the new houses “this year” (1890’s?)
Page 95

FRYE, George V.
FRYE, J. R.
Began business under the name of FRYE CARAMEL COMPANY at 207 Illinois Street 1890
Sold plant “under execution” to OATMAN BROTHERS Janaury 18, 1897
“There was considerable litigation over the matter and pending a decision the plant was
closed down. The parties who were interested in the controversy and who were stockholders
were George V. FRYE, E. J. OATMAN, F. G. OATMAN, Frederick BROWNING and George B. SCRIPPS.
Began FRYE CONFECTIONERY COMPANY at 1818 East Illinois Street where they manufactured
“Eureka” and “Perfection” brands of caramel paste February 1897
J. R. FRYE sold firm and name changed to GEORGE V. FRYE 1898
Firm name changed to J. R. FRYE 1899
Firm name changed back to GEORGE V. FRYE 1900
George now running a business in Iowa 1905
Page 89, 91

GADOW, William
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
First Vice President of newly formed National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association August
1895
Page 93

GAESSWITZ, George
Began jobbing business at 833 North Mozart Street in September 1, 1903
Page 123

GALLNICK, A. J.
Started jobbing business 1900
Page 119

GARDEN CITY FIREWORKS
Ad: GARDEN CITY FIREWORKS, Ripper Crackers, Torpedoes, Flags, Balloons, Lanterns, Etc.
Manufactured by: CONSOLIDATED FIREWORKS CO. OF AMERICA, 30 and 32 So. Water St. Chicago,
Chicago Branch Mngr. Sidney F. BEECH, Mgr. Write for catalog and prices”
Page 142 (Ad).

GARDEN CITY POPCORN WORKS
Ad: “Greene & Son, 46 State Street, Chicago, The Oldest Popcorn House in the World, POP
CORN BRICKS and WANT-A-BITE our New Confection, Salted Peanuts in Bulk or Packages, Give us
a Call — Opp. Masonic Temple”
Page 80 (Ad)

GARRITY, P. L.
Partnered with Edward SCANLAN in “The Great Western Candy Factory” at 172 North Wells
Street with retail outlet at 18 Clark Street 1861
Moved to 47 State Street 1864-1866 (partnership dissolved)
Moved to 39 Randolph Street where he employed M. L. BARRETT as a bookkeeper 1866
Moved to 33 and 35 River Street 1869 (burned out in fire)
Opened store at 100 Van Buren Street 1874-1876
Moved to 200 Clark Street 1876
Partnered again with Edward SCANLAN at 23 Lake Street 1879-1880
Died September 25, 1900
Page 17, 19

GARWOOD, William C.
Wm. C. GARWOOD business was renamed W. C. GARWOOD & CO. 1896
Moved from 154 lake to 24 Wabash Avenue 1896
“Wm. C. GARWOOD was a druggist in Evanston, who carried a side line of candies. He started
in to make a few candies for his own trade and was so successful that he finally abandoned
the drug business entirely.”
Bought out by the GARWOOD CANDY CO. at 135 Chicago Avenue in 1901
Page 111, 119

GAVIN, E. F.
Employed by M. SHIELDS
Partnered with N. S. WOOD, an actor, to begin manufacturing candy at 145 South Clinton
Street under the firm name of E. F. GAVIN & COMPANY May 1, 1892
Business failed February 22, 1893
Page 95

GEFFERT ROOFING COMPANY
Ad: “GEFFERT ROOFING COMPANY, Not Incorporated, Offices: 1056-1058 W. Harrison Street,
Chicago, Illinois. Felt, Tar, Composition, and Gravel Roofing. Estimates promptly
furnished.”
Page 186 (Ad)

GEORG, Adolph
(Henry and William, brothers)
Born in Germany 1844 to candy making family
Arrived in Milwaukee 1852 with brothers Henry and William
Arrived in Chicago February 1859
Enlisted in Union Army during Civil War April 1861 – 1864
Employed by SANFORD near the Briggs House 1864
Moved with SANFORD & CO. to new steam powered factory and store “the largest establishment
up to that time which had been erected for candy-making purposes.”
Employed by CHESTED at 31 North Clark Street “…thinking he could improve himself much more
advantageously in a smaller place than in a factory running with steam power. Finally Mr.
Georg thought that trading was better than working at the manufacturing business, so he
bought himself a horse and wagon to sell candy 1866
Purchased bakery business at 207 North Wells Street intending to refit it into a candy shop
but plans were ruined by the Great Fire of October 9, 1871
Opened confectionery store at North Side Turner Hall 1873 – 1895
Sold jobbing business to Geo. G. MERRILL 1873
Besides managing Turner Hall, imported German wines at 164 Randolph Street
Ad: “ADOLPH GEORG, Importer of Rhine & Moselle Wines, WEIN-STUBE “ZUM BINGER-LOCH.” 164 E.
Randolph St. Chicago, Illinois”
Page 37, 112 (Photo), 114 (Ad)

GEORG, Henry
(See Adolph GEORG)

GEORG, William
(See Adolph GEORG)

GEORGE
GEORGE & CHARLES
Succeeded to business of the TORMOEHLEN & BROS. moving it to 108 and 110 West Adams Stree
Sold out to The NATIONAL CANDY CO.
Page 43

GERBERICH, A. L.
(See also brothers, C. F. and F. J. GERBERICH)
Ad: “A. L. GERBERICH, 2081 W. Madison St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 113, 178 (Ad)

GERBERICH, C. F.
(See also brothers F. J. and A. L. GERBERICH)
Ad: “C. F. GERBERICH, 2081 W. Madison Street, Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 80 (Ad), 113

GERBERICH, F. J.
(Brother of C. F. and A. L. GERBERICH)
Began successful jobbing business April 1896
“With his brothers C. J. (Note: called C. F. GERBERICH on page 80 Ad) and A. L., they have
a large city and country trade.”
Ad: “F. J. GERBERICH, 1996 Wilcox Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 113, 159 (Ad)

GERTENRICH, John
Partnered with Ernest A. Morris and Theodore GOTTMANN, all former employees of M. SHIELDS &
CO. in new firm of E. A. MORRIS & CO. at 194 South Clinton Street March 25, 1887
Moved to 85 West Jackson Street 1888
Retired from firm and started new wholesale and manufacturing business at 44 South
Jefferson Street 1893
Moved to 85 West Jackson Street 1895
Moved to 248 Jackson Blvd. 1901
Business failed April 10, 1905
Page 83, 99

GIACHINI, M. S.
229 South Sangamon Street.
Ad:” M. S. GIACHINI, Leader in the Manufacture of Hand Made Chocolate Creams, Maker of the
Original Famous Venetian Chocolate Creams, Specialties, New Location 229 S. Sangamon St.,
Chicago”
Page 49 (Ad)

GICHINI, S.
Began manufacturing at 162 West Harrison 1900
Page 117

GLASSNER, George
Opened Confectionery business at 51 Lake Street 1849
Moved to 56 Lake Street 1854
Retired 1855
Page 11, 13

GLEMBOW, Frank
Bought route from J. G. DREIBUS (early 1890’s?)
Sold out jobbing business to A. PAPPENTHEIN 1894
Ran route until he went into sausage manufacturing 1903
Page 91, 107

GLENZ, Anton
Began jobbing business 1898
Still in business 1905
Mrs. A. GLENZ was member of Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’
Association when first formed March 1, 1905
Page 115, 125

GOBEL
BUGLER & GOBEL
Began manufacturing at 56 North Jefferson in 1902
Page 119

GOELITZ, Adolphe
GOELITZ, Gustava
GOELITZ, Herman
KELLEY & GOELITZ began manufacturing at 55 South Desplaines in 1904
Ad: (Two pages on yellow heavy paper, with red and black type):
THE GOELITZ CONFECTIONERY CO., Adolph Goelitz, President; Gustava Goelitz, Vice Pres; E. F.
Kelley, Secy & Treas., Herman Goelitz, Gen. Manager; Factories at Chicago and Cincinnati,
“None so Good” (trademark), “Butter Sweets” (trademark), “From ocean to ocean they shine
supreme” Photo of open lidded box with phot of young girl with hand on chin “Our Little
Butter Miss.” Page 2 of Add includes list of candies and prices for each.
Page 112-113 (2-page Ad), 123

GOETZ, George
Jobber who sold out in 1887
Page 79

GOLDMAN
WINTER & GOLDMAN
124 Dearborn Street
Started business 1878?
Page 51

GOLDSCHMITT, Julius
Began jobbing business 1899
Page 117

GOLDSTEIN, Joseph
Bought out S. Inlander’s jobbing business at 5010 Ashland Avenue on October 1, 1897
Ad: “Joseph GOLDSTEIN Jobbing Confectioner 5203 Ashland Avenue” 1905
Page 85, 113. 178 (Ad)

GORDON, Julius
Began selling good on foot to stores and the next year got a horse and wagon
In business until an inmate of hospitals for several months before dying
Business continued by Louis SCHAFER, who bought it out December 1, 1901
Page 65, 119

GORDON, Philip
Ad:”PHILIP GORDON, 319 W. 14th Street, Jobbing Confectioner, Telephone Canal 6102″
Ad: “Ph. GORDON 476 Union Street Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 114 (Ad), 170 (Ad)

GOTTMANN, Theodore
Partnered with Ernest A. Morris and Theodore GOTTMANN, all former employees of M. SHIELDS &
CO. in new firm of E. A. MORRIS & CO. at 194 South Clinton Street March 25, 1887
Moved to 85 West Jackson Street 1888
Changed firm name to MORRIS & GOTTMAN 1894
Moved to 158 West Jackson Street
Morris sold interest to Martin KRETCHMER and firm changed name to GOTTMANN & KRETCHMER at
158 West Jackson Street 1903-1904
Ad: “158 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois, is where the celebrated Surinam
Chocolates are manufactured. They are delicious “bitter sweet” and a big seller. A full
line of Novelties in new penny goods always on hand. GOTTMAN & KRETCHMER”
Page 40 (Ad), 83, 123

GOULD, Edward
Son of W. GOULD
Succeeded father in candy and popcorn business at 10 South Paulina Street 1885
Page 41

GOULD, W.
Father of Edward GOULD
Started in homemade candy and popcorn business at 141 South Jefferson Street
Moved to 148 South Water Street 1873
Son Edward succeeded him moving to 10 South Paulina Street
Retired by ill health 1885
Page 41

GOYKE, Julius M.
Having been employed in candy business previously started own business in June 1893
Built up a good trade during the short time he was in business
Page 103

GREEN, Frank
GREEN & PETERSON
Manufactured candies at 206 South Desplaines Street (early 1890’s?)
Did not remain in business long.
Is now a jobber 1905
Ad: “Frank GREEN Jobbing Confectioner, 125 Melrose Street”
Page 97, 163 (Ad)

GREENE & SON
GARDEN CITY POPCORN WORKS
46 State Street, Chicago
The Oldest Popcorn House in the World
POP CORN BRICKS and WANT-A-BITE our New Confection
Page 80 (Ad)

GREENFIELD. E.
Ad: “E. GREENFIELD’S SON & Co., New York, Sole Manufacturers of Chocolate Sponge,
Established 1848″
Hired John C. Neemes to be their Chicago Agent February 1897
Page 31, 84 (Ad)

GREIB, F. W.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

GROTH, G. A.
Bought out the jobbing business of William LEINDECKER September 1, 1894
“Has been strictly in the business ever since” 1905
Page 109

GROVE, A. M.
Sold out candy manufacturing business to John R. MULVEY in January 1892
Page 97

The GROVE CO.
Salem, Ohio
Ad: “Include in your next order from you jobber a box of Yellow Kid, Jumbo Trix and Hully
Gee Chewing Gum, Manufactured by The Grove Co., Salem Ohio”
Page 106 (Ad)

GUARINIAN, V. G.
Emigrated from Constantinople, Turkey to Chicago May 1, 1892
Partnered with V. MUGGERDITIAN to manufacture Fig paste and other Turkish Candies.
“Started in one small room 20 X 40 Feet at 207 South Canal Street and in March 1896 was
incorporated as the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.”
Moved to 249 South Jefferson Street 1897
Moved to 206 Illinois Street 1899
Moved to 198 and 200 South Center Avenue with plant of 12,000 square feet 1902
Ad: “V. G. GURINIAN, Pres. And Treas.; A. B. GURINIAN, Secy, THE ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING
CO., Established 1889, CONFECTIONERS, Makers of Specialties (12 listed) Send for samples
and quotations. 198-200 South Center Avenue, Chicago.”
Page 99, 167 (Ad)

GUEST, H. E.
Started in business in October 1894
Has been very successful.
Manufacturer as well as a jobber
At one time member of the firm GUEST & SULLIVAN CANDY CO. which began manufacturing at
11951 South Halsted in 1903
Ad: “GIBSON, SYKES and FOWLER, McVICKER’S THEATRE BLDG. “The Five “Live Wires” of the
Jobbing Confectioners of Chicago” Give us your orders for standard and up to date
confections” (each of the five gentlemen are identified by name and address: A. THOMPSON
7041 Union Ave., H. G. GUEST 11919 S. Halsted St., Albert FAYETTE 219 Oakley Blvd., H. H.
KINNE, 248 S. St. Louis Ave., Wm. WEIS, 43 Surrey Ct.)
Page 102 (Ad/Photo of “The Five “Live Wires””), 107, 121

GUNNING, J. K.
Sold out jobbing business to Fred J. PLATTNER 1894
Page 107

GUNTHER, Charles Frederick
Born Wildberg, Wurtemburg, Germany March 6, 1837
Emigrated with parents to Pennsylvania when five years old 1842
Moved from Pennsylvania to Peru, Illinois, 1850
At age of 14 employed as a clerk in a country store and later went to work in a drug store
“…where he gained quite an insight into the art of pharmacy.”
Became manager of the post office at Peru, Illinois,
Spent five years employed by banking house
Moved to Memphis, Tennesee, and employed by local ice dealer in 1860
Upon outbreak of Civil War employed as purchasing agent and purser of the steamer “Rose
Douglas”
in Confederate Service, captured when blockaded in Arkansas River by Federal gunboats
in Van Buren, Ark. “…he was exhanged and making his way north he finally reached Peru.”
“His life while acting in this capacity was anything but peaceful and his adventures were
many.”
Returned to Peoria where he was employed by banking house
Joined C. W. SANFORD, Chicago confectioner, as traveling salesman visiting the principal
cities of the South as well as those in Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and
West Virginia.” Fall 1863
“He next entered the employ of a wholesale grocery house, but the line was not to his taste
and he entered the employ of a New York confectionery house, which he represented in the
New England, Middle and Western states. In the meantime, Mr. Gunther had traveled
extensively in Europe and Asia and had a knowledge of how these people prepared confections
and, combined with what he learned of the business while representing manufacturers of
confectionery on the road, made him finally decide to enter business on his account.”
Opened Factory and store at 125 Clark Street Fall 1868 – October 8, 1871 (Fire)
Originated and introduced caramels, “which have been a staple product of all factories ever
since.”
After Great Fire destroyed factory and store, leaving him with almost no resources,
reopened factory/store at 78 Madison under McVicker’s Theater 1871 – 1886
Erected building at 212 State Street “which is a model both as retail store and factory”
1886
“…(his) name as a manufacturer of candies, is known from one end of the country to the
other.”
Page 27, 29, 128 (Photo)
GURINIAN, A. B.
(See also GUARINIAN, V. G. and the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.)
Emigrated from Constantinople, Turkey to Chicago May 1, 1892
Partnered with V. MUGGERDITIAN to manufacture Fig paste and other Turkish Candies.
“Started in one small room 20 X 40 Feet at 207 South Canal Street and in March 1896 was
incorporated as the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.”
Moved to 249 South Jefferson Street 1897
Moved to 206 Illinois Street 1899
Moved to 198 and 200 South Center Avenue with plant of 12,000 square feet 1902
Ad: “V. G. GURINIAN, Pres. and Treas.; A. B. GURINIAN, Secy, THE ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING
CO., Established 1889, CONFECTIONERS, Makers of Specialties (12 listed) Send for samples
and quotations. 198-200 South Center Avenue, Chicago.”
Page 99, 167 (Ad)

GURINIAN, V. G.
(Note spelled GUARINIAN on page 99)
Emigrated from Constantinople, Turkey to Chicago May 1, 1892
Partnered with V. MUGGERDITIAN to manufacture Fig paste and other Turkish Candies.
“Started in one small room 20 X 40 Feet at 207 South Canal Street and in March 1896 was
incorporated as the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.”
Moved to 249 South Jefferson Street 1897
Moved to 206 Illinois Street 1899
Moved to 198 and 200 South Center Avenue with plant of 12,000 square feet 1902
Ad: “V. G. GURINIAN, Pres. And Treas.; A. B. GURINIAN, Secy, THE ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING
CO., Established 1889, CONFECTIONERS, Makers of Specialties (12 listed) Send for samples
and quotations. 198-200 South Center Avenue, Chicago.”
Page 99, 167 (Ad)

HABICHT BRAUN & CO.
Ad: “New York – Chicago, HABICHT BRAUN & CO, Importers, Manufacturers and Dealers in Raw
Material, Everything to Manufacture Good Candies”
Page 96

HABIG, John
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

HAEHNLEN, Louis F.
Wholesale and Retail business at 92 West Randolph Street 1865-70
Employed Albert FAYETTE as city salesman until January 1, 1869
114 West Madison Street, 1870
Manufacturing and Wholesale at 116 West Madison Street 1872
42 South Water Street 1874
Partnered with Wm. CHALMERS in L. F. HAEHNLEN & CO. 1876
Partnered with Wm. R. Stevens and moved to 83 Michigan Ave. 1877
Partnered with Geo. H. BROOKS in BROOKS & HAEHNLEN corner of Michigan Ave. and Lake Street
1879
Moved to 9, 11,13 and 15 River Street 1882
Retired 1885
Began own business at Northeast corner of Madison and Canal Streets 1855
Moved plant to Belvidere, Illinois and then to 317 South Seventh Street, St. Louis, Mo.
Where still in business 1905
Page 17, 21, 39

HAGADORN, Charles
Began jobbing (late 1880’s?) and sold out in 1895
Page 89

HAGEMEISTER, William
Bought jobbers route of H. RECHTMEYER Feb. 3, 1886
Sold out to George H. SUNDERLAGE August 1891
Purchased a wagon from A. B. BURNHAM February 1, 1905
Still in jobbing business 1905
Resides: 257 Hirsch Street
Page 81, 83, 87, 95

HAGLEY’S
Ad: “HAGLEY’S Fine Chocolates — Chocolate Opera Cream Bar, 63 and 65 S. Deplaines Street,
Chicago”
(See also William HAGLEY — could be same person?)
Page 123, 147 (Ad)

HAGLEY, William
Began manufacturing at 175 South Desplaines in 1904
(See also Ad for “HAGLEY’S” – could be same person?)
Page 123, 147 (Ad)

HAINES, Thomas S.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

HALE
SMITH & HALE
Page 51

HAMILTON, William C.
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
First Treasurer of newly formed National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association August 1895
Page 93

HAMMER, Louis
Jobbing business at 112 North Wells Street in February until October 9, 1871 (the Big Fire)
Did not resume business after being burned out
Page 41

HAMMIL, Charles H.
In charge of manufacturing branch of GEORGE MILLER & SON, Philadelphia, that they opened at
corner of Van Buren and Franklin Streets March 1, 1892.
Discontinued Branch January 1, 1894
Page 97

HANSEN, Hans
Sold jobbing business to Louis LINDBERG January 20, 1900
Page 117

HANSEN, Jacob C.
(Note: spelled HANSON on Page 109)
Succeeded Peter KRUGER in the jobbing business June 1 1894
Still in business 1905
Ad: “J. HANSEN 717 Jefferson St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 109, 142 (Ad)

HANSON, Jacob C.
(Note: spelled HANSEN in Ad on page 142)
Succeeded Peter KRUGER in the jobbing business June 1 1894
Still in business 1905
Ad: “J. HANSEN 717 Jefferson St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 109, 142 (Ad)

HARRINGTON, Charles H.
Began wholesale and manufacturing concern at 184 Indiana Street 1892
Changed firm name to HARRINGTON & CO. March 1, 1893
“They had two wagons attending to city trade.”
Sold wagons to F. C. PARMAN and L. H. THOMAS and went out of business August 12, 1893
Page 59, 95, 97, 99

HATHAWAY, J. Harvey
Started jobbing, but was a transient selling to John B. BEATTIE (page 105 November 1, page
99 December 1) 1893
Page 99, 105

HATHAWAY, Thomas H. E.
Started in jobbing business on Sept 15, 1891
Still in business 1905
Ad: “T. H. E. HATHAWAY Dealer in high grade Penny Goods and Chocolates 410 N. Clark St”
Resides at: 410 North Clark Street 1905
Page 95. 135 (Ad)

HAWKES, George
Bought out jobbers’ route from F. F. BOLGER May 12, 1887
Sold out to Henry SCHAEFER May 1, 1890
Now dealing in grocers’ sundries 1905
Page 75, 85

HAWLEY
Describing the evolution of the candy trade from the mid 1850’s to 1905, “In consequence
there was little money spent for candies then in proportion to what there was later on,
when the quality was improved. This was not brought about by either the manufacturer or
retailer, but by the jobber, who gradually dropped out the sticky compounds and began
pushing such goods as HAWLEY’S Chocolate Drops, which by the way, was the first really good
chocolate drop to be put on the market…Where HAWLEY at first and LOWNEY for a brief time,
later on, had the reputation of making the finest goods on the market, they fast lost their
prestige as far superior goods are to-day placed on the market by any number of
manufacturers.
Page 127

HAWLEY
THORP, HAWLEY & CO.
Ad: “The 400 Marshmallows, The kind that tell — Made only by THORP, HAWLEY & CO.”
Page 186 (Ad)

HAWLEY & HOOPS
New York
“A No. !” Trademark
Page 64 (Ad)

HAYNES, Henry W.
Sold out and went into jobbing business in Kansas City, Kansas 1889
Page 83

HAYWARD
HAYWORD-WINDSOR Co. a wholesale and manufacturing concern established at 161 South Canal
Street on September 1, 1893
Business failed August 24, 1904
Page 95, 99

HEALD, Capt. J.
“In 1812, the war broke out with England and as the Indian tripes had allied themselves
with the English and as Chicago was an exposed position, the authorities at Detroit ordered
the commander of the Fort (note: Fort Chicago built at the mouth of the Chicago River in
1804), Captain J. Heald, to abandon the post and proceed with his troops to Ft. Wayne.”
Page 9

HELLMANN, Joseph B.
Came from Baltimore to Chicago in 1883
Left grocery business to go into jobbing confectionery business 1885
Purchased jobbers route from J. Merton CASE October 1885 and still in business 1905
Jobbing Manufacturer
Member of committee appointed by Jobbing Confectioners’ Association to explore creation of
national organization 1894
2nd Secretary, Vice-President, President and Chairman Executive Committee Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners’ Association
Delegate to the first convention to form the National Association in 1895 and has been
elected as a delegate several times since
Second Vice President of the National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, “…has been
prominently identified with the organization from the start, is an ex-president, has served
on many important committees, has bee delegate to several conventions and is chairman of
the Bade Committee for convention. He is well known by his sobriquet, “Uncle Joe.” 1905
HELLMAN, Mrs. Joseph B., first Secretary, Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners Association when first formed March 1, 1905(Group Photo Page 78, text 125)
Ad: “This is Uncle Joe — the Candy Man. JOSEPH B. HELLMAN, Jobbing Confectioner, Fine
Chocolates, Bon Bons, and Penny goods a Specialty. 44 Lexington Street – Chicago, Ill.”
Resides at 44 Lexington Street
Page 16 (Photo/Ad), 38 (Photo), 79, 67, 78 (Mrs. HELLMANN Group Photo), 93, 125. 187

HENNIGAN, J. B.
Foreman of O. PAGE & CO. candy factory in the alley at the rear of McVicker’s Theater
Bought out O. PAGE & CO. and moved to 193 Water Street 1858
Partnered with Nick Crickard in HENNIGAN & CRICKARD 1862
Retired 1866
Page 23

HERSCHENROEDER, Henry
Entered the jobbing field in October (late 1880’s)
Sold out to George W. FERGUSON on October 12, 1887
Page 83, 85

HESS BROS.
Manufactured candy on West Randolph Street 1857
Bought out factory of C. H. MEYER on West Randolph Street near Canal 1858
Ad: “HESS Brothers Inc., Fine Candies and Chocolates, 502 to 516 West 30th Street, New York,
USA”
Page 23, 89 (Ad)

HETH, J. P.
Began manufacturing candy at 79 Randolph Street 1851
Moved to Clinton near Madison Street 1854
Employed Edward SCANLAN as a clerk 1854
Page 11, 13, 17

HIBBEN, Samuel E. (Mrs.)
Daughter of John C. NEEMES
Page 31

HICKMAN, Francis W.
(SASSAMAN & HICKMAN
Partnered with Charles SASSAMAN in SASSAMAN & HICKMAN at 47 Randolph Street Manufacturing
1854
Carried a line of confectionery tools
63 Randolph Street 1858
Sold interest to Geo. H. Brooks 1859
In business by himself at 178 State Street 1858-1861
Went out of business 1861
Page 13, 23

HILDEBRANDT, Gust
Began jobbing confectionery in 1894
Sold out to W. D. CARLISLE 1894
Page 107

HILKER, Henry
Began jobbing “at this time” (late 1890’s?)
Later in charge of jobbing department of ALBERT BUNTE & CO.
In charge of jobbing department of BUNTE, FRANK & CO.
Went back into jobbing business where still works 1905
Page 75, 77

HINZ, Martin
Began jobbing business 1900
Ad: “Martin HINZ 32 Poe St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 119, 135 (Ad)

HOECKZEMA, O.
Started out with a wagon (as a “jobber”) in the Fall of 1869
Per Page 125, started jobbing business in May 1871
Retired on selling out to F.F. KRAUSE 1904
Page 39, 125

HOFFMAN
Partnered with Lawrence E. LENT 799 West Madison Street (dissolved same year) 1879
Page 39

HOFFMAN, Charles Sr.
Began jobbing candies (late 1880’s?) and remained at it until May 1905 when he retired from
business
Page 89

HOFFMAN, Charles
197 East Fullerton Avenue
Bought out jobbing business of E. KLEIN April 10, 1905
Ad: “Chas. HOFFMAN 203 E. Fullerton Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 79, 125, 182 (Ad)

HOFFMAN, Frederick
Began jobbing early in 1889
Sold out to J. E. PARMAN Sept. 1, 1895
Went into manufacturing business September 1895
Manufacturing as F. HOFFMAN & CO. at 147 Illinois in 1904
Junior member of WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN, 185 Ontario Street 1905
Ad: “WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN, Manufacturing Confectioners, 85-87 Ontario Street, Phone North
1950 – Chicago, Specialties in Marshmallow and Cream Goods”
Page 89, 109, 114 (Ad), 123

HOLMGREN, Warner
Ad: ” Warner HOLMGREN, 1406 Irving Park Blvd Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 182 (Ad)

HOMEYER, Henry
Manufacturer of Popcorn Specialties
147 Illinois Street, Chicago
Page 72 (Ad)

HOSSACK, William
147 Lake Street 1839
Sold out to D. A. BARROWS & CO. prior to 1843
Page 11

HOYT, Frank W.
Ad: “Frank W. HOYT, Attorney at Law, 225 Dearborn Street, Rooms 820-824, Chicago”
Page 155 (Ad)

HUCKINS, A. A.
In cigar and tobacco business
Began jobbing candies 1880’s
Financial Secretary of the Confectionery Agents’ Union and President when organization
disbanded
Remained in business until he died several years afterward
Page 69

HUCKINS, C. L.
Began business as jobber “this year” September 1, 1878(?)
Still a jobber in 1905
Ex-President of the Association (Jobbing Confectioners’) and represented it to National
Association
Page 67

HUNT
WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO.
Cleveland, Ohio
Ad: “We are the originators and makers of the only GENUINE ITALIAN CREAM on the market.
Flavors: Vanila, Chocolate, Orange, Peach Also the original PRINCESS KISS, A most delicious
piece of molasses candy. We also make Creameata Nut Nougat and Vanila and Chocolate Walnut
block. BEWARE OF IMITATIONS! Attempts have been and are being made to imitate our goods.
Our goods are still unequaled. The WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO. Cleveland, Ohio.”
Page 139 (Ad)

HUNT, Frank
Made his bow to the candy trade as a jobber in June 1893
Was in business for a few years
Sold jobbing business to B. M. COLE on transfer of card from Robert SPEAR November 1902
Has also been in city department of M. SHIELDS & CO.
Page 103, 121

HUTCHINSON, John
Partnered with Charles SASSAMAN in SASSAMAN & HUTCHINSON 200 Clark Street 1879
Bought out SASSAMAN
Partnered with Albert JAMIESON in HUTCHINSON & JAMIESON 159 West Madison Street 1879
Sold out to Charles MATT 1880
Page 15, 59

HYDE PARK CANDY CO.
Began manufacturing at 630 Forty-third Street in 1901
Page 119

HYNONS
(Note: Also spelled “HYNOUS” on page 99 and in Ad page 146)
BENDA & HYNONS
Bought business of W. M. URBANCK Nov. 1, 1893
(Note: URBANCK also spelled “URBANEK” on page 99)
Do a large business at 1184 South Spaulding Avenue 1905
Ad: “BENDA & HYNOUS 1184 South Spaulding Avenue, We are the SPECIALTY men you are looking
for. Have you seen our Penny BUTTON & BADGE PRIZE — The greatest seller on the market.
We also have new candy by the carloads. Drop us a Postal and be convinced.”
Page 53, 99, 146 (Ad)

HYNOUS
(Note: Also spelled “HYNONS” on page 53)
BENDA & HYNONS
Bought business of W. M. URBANCK Nov. 1, 1893
(Note: URBANCK also spelled “URBANEK” on page 99)
Do large business at 1184 South Spaulding Avenue 1905
Ad: “BENDA & HYNOUS 1184 South Spaulding Avenue, We are the SPECIALTY men you are looking
for. Have you seen our Penny BUTTON & BADGE PRIZE — The greatest seller on the market.
We also have new candy by the carloads. Drop us a Postal and be convinced.”
Page 53, 99. 146 (Ad)

INLANDER, S.
Began jobbing business on May 1, 1888
Business located at 5010 Ashland Avenue 1897
Continued in candy business until October 1, 1897
Sold out to Joseph GOLDSTEIN to embark in the paper business 1897
Page 85, 113

JACOBSON, Julius J.
Started jobbing business 1894
Begins manufacturing at 44 Frank Street in 1902
Ad: “J. J. JACOBSON Jobbing Confectioner 607 S. Albany Av.”
Page 109, 119, 142 (Ad)

JAMISON, Albert
Partnered with John HUTCHINSON at 159 West Madison Street
Page 59

JANSEN, A.
Bought out jobbing business of Bernhard TORMOEHLEN December 15, 1896
Ad: “A. JANSEN Wholesale Confectioner 1524 Lexington St., Chicago”
Page 113, 182 (Ad)

JEFFERSON, S. R.
Partnered with Edward MORAN, purchased business of Charles SASSAMAN, became S. R. JEFFERSON
& Co. and located at 92 West Randolph Street 1865
Edward MORAN replaced by James REED as partner, new firm name became JEFFERSON & REED and
moved to 159 South Clark Street 1866
Sold out interest to MORGAN 1868
Opened retail business at 324 West Madison Street 1870
Moved to 150 South Halsted St where he continued for a number of years 1873
Page 15, 35

JENSEN, T. H.
Began manufacturing at 208 Illinois 1900
Predecessor of CAMERON & MARBACH
102-104 W. Adam Street
Page 31 (Ad), 117

JERSA, Steve
(Note: Spelled “JIRSA” on page 125)
1139 Sawyer Avenue
Began in jobbing business buying out Thomas ZAJICEK January 7, 1905
Ad: “Steve JERSA, 1139 S. Sawyer Ave Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 125, 134 (Ad)

JETTER, Albert
Came from Buffalo, New York to Chicago
Vice President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Appointed as committee member to create Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1894
First Sergeant at Arms of newly formed National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1895
Page 83, 93

JIENCKE CANDY CO.
Begins manufacturing at 104 South Desplaines in 1902
Page 119

JIRSA, Steven
Note: Spelled “JERSA” in ad on page 134)
1139 Sawyer Avenue
Began in jobbing business buying out Thomas ZAJICEK January 7, 1905
Ad: “Steve JERSA, 1139 S. Sawyer Ave Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 125, 134 (Ad)

JONANOVICH
ROESCHMANN & JONANOVICH
Began manufacturing at 171 South Desplaines 1901
Page 119

JOOST, Henry
Retail and wagon trade at 108 West Lake Street 1861 – 1884
Bought out “jobber” business of Henry DEYOUNG 1878
Retired 1884
Page 25, 39

JORDAN, August
Began business on November 18th (perhaps 1880’s?)
Served as representative of the Chicago Association to the National Association (of Jobbing
Confectioners)
Member of the Finance Committee of the national convention (National Jobbing Confectioner’s
Association)
Ad: “Aug. JORDAN Jobbing Confectioner 1299 Southport Avenue (includes photo of horse and
wagon)”
Resides at 1299 Southport Avenue 1905
Page 67, 150 (Ad)

JOSSELYN, E. H.
Ad: “ONE MOMENT PLEASE! If you do not want to handle pure, good eating penny goods, for
goodness sake, don’t buy JOSSELYN’S cocoanut waffles and macaroons…NUF SAID! E. H.
JOSSELYN — Baltimore, Maryland”
Page 163 (Ad)

JUNG, Wm. H.
Ad: “WM. H. JUNG Restaurateur 106 E. Randolph St., Chicago, Party and Wedding Dinners
arranged in Modern Style”
Page 186 (Ad)
KADERLI, Franz
Began jobbing (late 1880’s?) and is still at it in 1905
Ad: “FRANZ KADERLI Wholesale Confectioner 273 Center Street”
Resides at 273 Center Street
Page 87, 135 (Ad)

KADERLI, Fred
Began business about the same time (as Franz KADERLI — in late 1880’s?)
Page 87

KASPAR, Anton
Began jobbing candies on Sept 9 1889
Branched out as a manufacturer of specialities 1900
Located at 1067 South Homan Avenue 1905
Mrs. A. KASPAR was member of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’
Association when first formed March 1, 1905
Ad: “ANTON KASPAR, 1067 S. Homan Ave. Manufacturer of ATLAS WAFERS and Dealer in all kinds
of Candies”
Page 89, 125, 186 (Ad)

KEHOE
BOLES & KEHOE
Began manufacturing at 71 State Street and still in business 1905
Main business to supply their retail trade
Page 69

KELLEY, E. F.
KELLEY & GOELITZ began manufacturing at 55 South Desplaines in 1904
Ad: (Two pages on yellow heavy paper, with red and black type):
THE GOELITZ CONFECTIONERY CO., Adolph Goelitz, President; Gustava Goelitz, Vice Pres; E. F.
Kelley, Secy & Treas., Herman Goelitz, Gen. Manager; Factories at Chicago and Cincinnati,
“None so Good” (trademark), “Butter Sweets” (trademark), “From ocean to ocean they shine
supreme” Photo of open lidded box with phot of young girl with hand on chin “Our Little
Butter Miss.” Page 2 of Add includes list of candies and prices for each.
Page 112-113 (2-page Ad), 123

KERR (& REYNOLDS)
70 North Clark Street
Page 13

KESSLER, L. H.
Bought out horse and wagon business of M. L. ROBERTS 1884
Sold out in 1895
Page 57, 79

KING, W. R.
Added candies to his toy business and was a jobber until moving to New York City in 1885
Page 77

KINNE, Harry H.
248 South St. Louis Avenue
Became a jobber in June 1896
“…at once became a debator among the debators in the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association,
has been Vice President and a delegate to the national body.” 1905
Ad: “GIBSON, SYKES and FOWLER, McVICKER’S THEATRE BLDG. “The Five “Live Wires” of the
Jobbing Confectioners of Chicago” Give us your orders for standard and up to date
confections” (each of the five gentlemen are identified by name and address: A. THOMPSON
7041 Union Ave., H. G. GUEST 11919 S. Halsted St., Albert FAYETTE 219 Oakley Blvd., H. H.
KINNE, 248 S. St. Louis Ave., Wm. WEIS, 43 Surrey Ct.)
Page 102 (Ad/Photo of “The Five “Live Wires””), 113

KINSON, Henry
(Employed by DINET 1849-50)
Page 11

KIRCHMAN, Max
PETERMICHEL & KIRCHMAN began jobbing candies (late 1880-early 1890?)
“In a few months, Max KIRCHMAN bought out his partner and started manufacturing at 774 West
12th Street, corner of Paulina” 1892
Sold jobbers route to V. MACHEK March 1893
Sold jobbing route to J. RUPPERT 1894
Built factory further west on 12th Street where he remained until 1894
Surrendered business to creditors
Restarted business at 181 West Randolph Street in 1896
Gradually changed business into grocers’ sundries
Page 75, 95, 99, 109

KLAUS, Charles H.
3949 Fifth Avenue
Bought out jobbing business from Martin SCHROEDER February 2, 1905
Page 105, 125

KLEIN, E.
567 West Huron Street
Began jobbing in July (late 1880’s?) per page 79
Began jobbing in May 1885 per page 125
Remained in business until April 10, 1905
Sold out to Charles HOFFMAN
Page 79, 125

KLEINBECK
FRYE, KLEINBECK AND BAUM
195 Michigan Avenue
One of the new houses “this year” (early 1890’s?)
Page 95

KLEINTGES, P.
(Employed by DINET 1849-50)
Page 11

KLICKA, Frank
(Note: Spelled KLIKA on pages 125 and in Ad on page 159)
Started at the same time (1893) and has remained in business 1905
Mrs. F. Klika, member of Ladies Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
when first formed March 1, 1905
Ad: “FRANK KLIKA 872 Harding Av. Jobbing Confectioners”
Page 103, 125, 159 (Ad)

KLIKA, Frank
(Note: Spelled KLICKA on page 103)
Started at the same time (1893) and has remained in business 1905
Mrs. F. Klika, member of Ladies Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
when first formed March 1, 1905
Ad: “FRANK KLIKA 872 Harding Av. Jobbing Confectioners”
Page 103, 125, 159 (Ad)

KNAPP, Richard J.
Added a line of candies to his bakery business then abandoned bakery line
City salesman for BROOKS & HAEHNLEN
Went into business for himself until Spring 1899
In retail business at Robey Street and Grand Avenue 1905
Page 63

KNICKERBOCKER CHOCOLATE CO., INC.
99 Randolph St., Chicago
Ad: “KNICKERBOCKER CHOCOLATE, CO., INC. (logo: circle inside of which is drawing of Peter
Stuyvesant, his name, the word “trademark” and around the perimeter, the words
“KNICKERBOCKER CHOCOLATE CO. – NEW YORK”). Manufacturers of 16 to 1 Chocolate 1 cent bars.
Chicago Office, 99 Randolph St. Insist on getting the best — There is no other piece just
as good. If your supply wagon man doesn’t carry it drop a postal to the above address and
we will have you supplied by an up to date wagon man who carries this article in stock.”
Page 182 (Ad)

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ad: “VAN BUREN Lodge No. 531. Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall — N. W. Corner Madison St.,
and California Ave., Chicago. Regular Conventions every Wednesday evening at eight o’clock;
Rank Work first three conventions of each month. Visitors cordially invited. W. L.
CALLAWAY, Chancellor Commander. W. L. CHRYSTAL, K. of R. & S.”
Page 114

KNOCKENMUSS, George
Began jobbing business 1897
Went out of business 1899
Page 115

KNOER, George
(Confusing entries on page 125 listing George KNOER as starting jobbing in 1904 at Moffat
St address and George KNORR starting in 1905 (no address) while ad on page 170 lists George
KNORR at Moffat Street Address — These may be same person)
69 Moffat Street
Started out jobbing business buying out F. F. KRAUS January 1905
Ad: “Geo. KNORR 69 Moffat St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 125, 170 (Ad)

KNORR, George
(Confusing entries on page 125 listing George KNOER as starting jobbing in 1904 at Moffat
St address and George KNORR starting in 1905 (no address) while ad on page 170 lists George
KNORR at Moffat Street Address — These may be same person)
Started in jobbing business 1904
Ad: “Geo. KNORR 69 Moffat St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 125, 170 (Ad)

KOEBELIN, John L.
Bought out jobbing business of Michael ZUBER at 1242 North Halsted February 1899
Ad: “John L. Koebelin, 1242 N. Halsted St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 107, 117, 134 (Ad)

KOENITZER, Gustav
Began as jobber in May (1870’s?)
“(he) saw many of the ups and downs of the business during the time he was on a wagon.”
Sold out to William H. YOUNG January 5, 1903
Page 59, 121

KOESSLER, August
Began jobbing January 5, 1879
“well known for his comical stories…and was always with the jobbers who aimed at better
conditions.”
Represented the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association to the national body and was member of
the amusement committee and instrumental in getting up many charming entertainments
Sold his business to F. A. SEBASTIAN on March 20, 1905
Now in the bakery business 1905
Page 67, 125

KOHNSTAMM, H.
KOHNSTAMM & CO.
Ad: “ATLAS Non-Poisonous Colors, H. KOHNSTAMM & CO., New York, Chicago, Brilliant Rose,
Warranted free from poison”
Page 150 (Ad)

KOHS, Charles W.
Started jobbing business June 1896
Sold out to Charles H. LINDEMANN January 28, 1897
Member of the Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
Page 113

KOPP, Jacob
Brother of Michael KOPP
Went to Omaha with Anton C. DREIBUS and brother, Michael KOPP, and formed firm of KOPP,
DRIEBUS & CO. 1884
Page 69

KOPP, Michael
Brother of Jacob KOPP
Worked for John KRANZ as wagon driver and city salesman
Drove wagon for BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR at 416 State Street 1876
City salesman for SPOEHR & SCHWARTZ
City salesman for C. A. SPOEHR
Went into business for himself 1880
Organizer of first Jobbers’ Association in the United States
Organizer, First Marshal and eventually President of Confectionery Agents’ Union at 54 West
Lake Street in November 1880
Went to Omaha with Anton C. DREIBUS and brother, Jacob KOPP, and formed firm of KOPP,
DRIEBUS & CO. 1884
Withdrew from that firm and went to Salt Lake City, Utah, in September 1888
Began selling out to the WESTERN CANDY CO. on Nov. 1, 1900
Largely interested in mining properties 1905
Page 55, 57. 69, 73

KRANZ, John
Born in Germany 1841
Emigrated at comparatively young age first to Philadelphia “…where he learned the trade of
candy making in a first class establishment.”
Moved to Chicago 1869
Began manufacturing candy at 285 South Halsted Street 1870
Moved to 115 Blue Island Avenue and started out two wagons 1871
Employed Charles A. SPOEHR 1871-1876
Employed Albert and Gustav BUNTE
Employed Ferdinand BUNTE as foreman pre-1885
Employed Albert BUNTE as foreman 1888-1905
Employed Michael KOPP and Adam SCHOTT as wagon drivers pre-1876
Moved to 78 and 80 South State Street 1873
Purchased business of and employed Frank PILGRIM at 256 Milwaukee Ave. May 1, 1875
Purchased property at 74 and 76 Randolph Street for factory 1877 (still in use in 1905)
“John Kranz has been one of the most successful manufacturers of confectionery that Chicago
has ever had and this success is largely attributable to the fact that his goods have
universally been of a high grade. During the early seventies large quantities of cheap
candy were placed upon the market and prices were cut right and left. The aim of the
manufacturer seemed to be to give as much as he possibly could for the money. This state
of affairs soon led (to) disastrous results and a number of makers of cheap goods had to
retire from the business. John Kranz had his own ideas about these cheap goods and refused
absolutely to enter into competition with them. On the other hand, he kept improving his
product and asking a higher price for it. The result was that the wagon man and the
retailer were both able to sell his goods at a fair profit and he built up a sound and
ever-increasing business.”
Page 35, 41, 43, 51

KRAUS, F. F.
(Note: Spelled as KRAUSE on page 39)
Bought out “jobber” business of O. HOECKZEMA in 1904
Sold out business to George KNOER January 1905
Page 39, 125

KRAUSE, F. F.
(Note: Spelled as KRAUS in two places on page 125)
Bought out “jobber” business of O. HOECKZEMA in 1904
Sold out business to George KNOER January 1905
Page 39, 125

KRAUSE, O. H.
Bought out F. A.. MERRILL’S jobber business (late 1880’s?)
Page 81

KRAWITZ, L.
Started in July 1893, remaining in business for about five years 1898
Page 103

KRETCHMER, Martin C.
Purchased business from Matt OWENS
KRETCHMER bought out interest of Ernest A. MORRIS and partnered with Theodore GOTTMANN in
firm of GOTTMAN & KRETCHMER at 158 West Jackson Street 1903-1904
Ad: “158 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois, is where the celebrated Surinam
Chocolates are manufactured. They are delicious “bitter sweet” and a big seller. A full
line of Novelties in new penny goods always on hand. GOTTMAN & KRETCHMER”
Member of Committee appointed to form national jobbers association 1894
Incorporator and first Recording Secretary of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners’
Association March 10, 1901
Page 40 (Ad), 51, 93, 123

KREUGER, A. F. Paul
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

KROELL, J. F.
67 Forty-first Avenue
Started in jobbing business having bought out business of G. J. PLACK at 1990 Wilcox Avenue
April 1905
Ad: “J. F. KROELL 67 41st Avenue Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 125 , 178 (Ad)

KRUGER, Peter
Sold jobbing business to Jacob C. HANSON June 1, 1894
Page 109

KUHL, Bernard “Cool Benny”
Began jobbing August 12, 1889
Past Vice President of Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, representative to the national
body and prominent on committees
Still active in business 1905
Ad: “BEN KUHL, 1974 Elston Av. Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at: 1974 Elston Avenue 1905
Page 89, 134 (Ad)

KUYVENHOVEN, John
Started as a “jobber” Feb 1 (no year, but likely 1870’s)
Located at 517 Blue Island Avenue 1905
Ad “John KUYVENHOVEN, 517 Blue Island Ave. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 57, 159 (Ad)

LAEMMER, August
Began jobbing “this year” (perhaps 1880’s)
Continued until retirement on account of health 1896
Died 1904
Page 75

LAMA, B
Bought out jobbing business of Ernest SCHOENHOFF 1894
Page 109

LANCASTER
LANCASTER CARAMEL CO.
Began as wholesale and manufacturing company at 119 West Harrison in 1893
Page 99

LANDGRAF, William
Bought out jobbing business of William SCHOTTMILLER in June 1893
Has since been identified with jobbing interests 1905
Member of Finance Committee of Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and a representative to
the national body; “Is one of the men who have steadily worked to crowd all short count and
unfair goods out of the market.”
Resides at 514 Francisco Street 1905
Ad: “Wm LANDGRAF, 514 N. Francisco St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 83, 103, 155 (Ad)

LANDIS, H.
Bought out H. YOUNKER’S wagon jobber business May 1876
Went out of business Fall 1883
Page 51

LANGAN, John B.
Partnered with Michael Shields as M. SHIELDS & CO. at 43 and 45 State Street 1884
Moved to 51 – 55 South Jefferson Street “one of the lightest, if not the lightest, plants
used for a candy factory in Chicago, and installed entirely new machinery. The firm dos a
large trade with the jobbers of Chicago.”
Page 65

LARSEN, L.
Sold out jobbing business to Charles STRUCK August 1898
Page 115

LAWLER, William
Began a jobbing business in 1901
On the Entertainment Committee of the National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Convention
Ad: “Wm. LAWLER 1488 Washtenaw Av. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 119, 134 (Ad)

LAUER
LAUER & SUTER CO.
Ad: “We are manufacturers of good eating and good selling Penny Novelties See our samples
before buying. The LAUTER & SUTER CO. 1420 to 1431 Philpot Street, Baltimore, Maryland”
Page 147 (Ad)

LAUTENSLAGER, B. A.
Ad: “LAXATIVA CHEWING GUM is a ready seller where once introduced; for who once tries it
will always buy it, for nine out of ten troubled with constipation are in the habit of
using such as pill tablets, etc., which can be done away with and still do the work y
chewing LAXATIVA Chewing gum, which is sold by all wide awake storekeepers, as it is
increasing their trade and adding more profit to their business. For sale by all up to
date candy men. Ask for it. Manufactured only by B.A. LAUTENSLAGER CO., 161 So. Canal
Street, Chicago, Illinois.”
Page 170 (Ad)

LEIMERT, Wm.
Came to Chicago from Philadelphia May 1857
Hired as candy factory foreman by Sassaman & Hickman 1857
“After LEIMERT was hired as foreman the firm began to turn out new goods. Leimert brought
with him from Philadelphia many new ideas and was the first in Chicago to make cococanut
(sic) cakes, cream goods and bon-bons. Nothing but hard goods were mad ein Chicago prior
to this time and the majority of manufactures was stick candy.”
Partnered with Mark S. VANDUZEN and John C. NEEMES & Co. 1878 -1892
Foreman of “Berry’s” new factory 1905
Page 13, 31

LEINDECKER, William
Sold jobbing business to G. A. GROTH September 1, 1894
Page 109

LENT, Lawrence E.
LENT, Mrs. Lawrence E. Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners Association (Group
Photo Page 78, text 125)
Born at Belle Isle, New York on January 11, 1845
Employed by Robert H. FISH from spring of 1865 to May 1, 1868
Employed by R. J. CAMPBELL as city salesman at business located at southwest corner of Lake
and Paulina Streets until May 1, 1872 – May, 1872
Built wagon and went into business for himself May 1, 1872
Partnered with Mr. HOFFMAN in firm of HOFFMAN & LENT at 799 West Madison Street (dissolved
same year) 1879
Went into business for himself again as jobber of candies 1879
Treasurer of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, “…is the oldest in the jobbing
business in Chicago…os always a consistent and able worker in the business.” 1905
Chairman of the Committee on Arrangements
Member of Finance Committee of the convention
Still in business and resides at 811 Warren Avenue (in 1905)
Page 37, 39, 50 (Photo), 72 (Ad). 78 (Mrs. Lent Group Photo), 95, 125, 187

LENZ, S. R.
Sold out jobbing business to Julius SENDLINGER at 138 Sigel Street June 1902
Page 121

LEUDTKE, Henry G.
Bought out wagon jobber business of Austin WALSH Spring 1873
Trustee of the newly formed Confectioners’ Agents’ Union 1880
Ran business until death May 1891
Son succeeded him and continued business until May 15, 1893
Son sold out to Henry MEISTERLING May 15, 1893
Page 51, 73

LEUSCH, August
Started jobbing business August 1 (no year, perhaps 1880’s)
Officer of both the Confectionery Agents’ Union and the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Sergeant at Arms of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners Association March 10, 1901
Sold out to Charles BRANDENBURG on August 1, 1892
Page 63, 93, 99

LEVERENTZ, Henry W.
General Teaming
Office: 248 South Desplaines Street
Residence: 111 Bissell Street between Clay and Willow, Chicago
Page 72 (Ad)

LEWIS, E. J.
Began as manufacturer at 290 State Street 1870
After “the fire” (October 9, 1871) moved to 686 State Street
Moved to Robey and West Lake Street 1874
Retired 1882
Page 41

LINDBERG, Louis
Bought out jobbing business of Hans HANSEN January 20, 1900
406 West Chicago Avenue
Ad: “Louis LINDBERG, Wholesale Confectioner, 353 N. Lincoln Street”
Page 117, 155 (Ad)

LINDEMANN, Charles H.
Bought out jobbing business of Charles W. KOHS January 28, 1897
Member of the Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and on the
Banquet Committee of the Convention
Ad: “Chas. H. LINDEMANN Jobbing Confectioner 3063 Broad St.”
3063 Broad Street 1905
Page 113, 115, 135 (Ad)

LINDEMAN, Fred
Bought a horse, wagon and route from Adam SCHOTT Spring 1878
Notable figure in the business retired in 1894
Page 65

LINK, R.
Began as manufacturer at 191 East Washington Street
Burned out and quit business
Page 41

LOBENTHAL, A..
(Note spelled “L. LOBETHAL” on page 79)
Began jobbing in July (perhaps late 1880’s?)
Continued ’til having been killed by a “runaway” (horse?) on August 3, 1892
Frank ROTH assumed business
Page 79, 97

LOBETHAL, L.
(Note: spelled “A. LOBENTHAL” on page 97)
Began jobbing in July (perhaps late 1880’s?)
Continued ’til having been killed by a “runaway” (horse?) on August 3, 1892
Frank ROTH assumed business
Page 79, 97

LOERCKE, O. W.
Sold out jobbing business to William REIDENBACH 1894
Bought out jobbing business of Eli A. BAUMEISTER 1899
Page 85, 107

LOWNEY
LOWNEY CO.
279 Madison
Began as wholesale and manufacturing concern 1892
Describing the evolution of the candy trade from the mid 1850’s to 1905, “In consequence
there was little money spent for candies then in proportion to what there was later on,
when the quality was improved. This was not brought about by either the manufacturer or
retailer, but by the jobber, who gradually dropped out the sticky compounds and began
pushing such goods as HAWLEY’S Chocolate Drops, which by the way, was the first really good
chocolate drop to be put on the market…Where HAWLEY at first and LOWNEY for a brief time,
later on, had the reputation of making the finest goods on the market, they fast lost their
prestige as far superior goods are to-day placed on the market by any number of
manufacturers.
Page 95, 127

LUCETT, J. J.
Began jobbing candies in March 1897
Resides at: 171 North Humboldt Street 1905
Ad: “J. J. LUCETT, 171 N. Humboldt St., Wholesale Confectioner)
Page 113, 155 (Ad)

LYON & CO.
Began manufacturing at 34 Washington 1900
Plant at 51 South Union Street absorbed by the NATIONAL CANDY COMPANY IN 1903
Page 117, 121

MACHEK, V.
Bought out a jobbers route from Max KIRCHMAN March 1893
“…has large trade in his section of the city.”
Resides at 1200 South Sawyer Avenue
Page 99

MACINTOSH, George H.
Formerly a jobber at Kansas City, Missouri
Moved to Chicago November
Member of several important committees of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Retired from business August 1, 1893
Sold out to Joseph A. WEIDERKEHR
Page 67

MACKENZIE, Robert F.
THE ROBERT F. MACKENZIE CO.
Cleveland, Ohio
“Wee MACGREGOR Cough Drops,” “Old Hickory Nut Nougat,” Sunbeam Kisses,” Blue Bell Brand
Italian Cream
Ad Insert between pages 22 and 23

MAGINN, Charles
CHARLES MAGINN & CO.
12 North State Street
Began manufacturing in late 1880’s
Page 81

MARBACH
CAMERON & MARBACH
Partner of J. W. CAMERON
102-104 West Adams Street
In partnership with CAMERON bought out T. H. JENSON at 171 and 173 South Desplaines
creating CAMERON & MARBACH May 1, 1904
Tore down building and relocated to 102 and 104 West Adams Street (formerly owned by Arthur
STEIN) where they have floor space of about 10,000 square feet May 1, 1905
Ad: “CAMERON & MARBACH, Successors to T. H. JENSEN, Manufacturing Confectioners, 102-104 W.
Adams Street, Chicago, Italian Cream and Cocoanut Specialties, Fine Sherbert Penny Goods,
Manufacturers of the well known “MILLS BRAND” Salted Peanuts”
Page 32 (Ad), 91,123

MARUGG, Richard
MARUGG, Mrs. Richard, first Chairman Amusement Committee of the Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago
Jobbing Confectioners Association when formed March 1, 1905 (Group Photo Page 78, text 125)
Bought a route from Albert CURETON January 1, 1896
Today a partner of A. E. ABBS & CO 1905
Member of the Finance Committee of the National Convention
Ad: “A. E. ABBS & CO. 30 Park Avenue “Jobbers of all kinds of Fine Confectionery” (includes
photo of Richard MARUGG and A. E. ABBS) Your wants and orders will be promptly attended
to.”
Page 36 (Photo/Ad), 78 (Mrs. MARUGG Group Photo), 113, 125

MATHER, C.S.
C.S. MATHER & SON began manufacturing specialties August 1 1894
In business still as WESTERN CONFECTIONERY CO., Jackson and Clinton Streets, 1904
Specialty is popcorn goods
Page 52 (Ad), 109

MATHES
MATHES & MCINTYRE
Wholesale business at 108 Dearborn Street 1869
Succeeded by E. G. MCINTYRE in 1870
Burned out 1871
Page 41

MATT, Charles
Bought out HUTCHINSON & JAMIESON 159 Madison Street and afterwards failed1880
Bought out the jobbing business of A. CONKLIN 1884
Sold business back to A. CONKLIN 1885
Page 15, 69

MCDONALD BROS.
206 State Street
Partnered with C. P. STILLMAN as MCDONALD BROS. & STILLMAN
“Manufactured several specialties and built up a fair trade”
Transferred business to Pittsburg in Fall 1876
Page 53, 57

MCGREEVEY, H.
Son of P.H. MCGREEVEY
Continued father’s “jobber” business from 1872 – 1905
Page 39

MCGREEVEY, P. H. (MCGREEVEY, H., Son)
Started by running a wagon (as a “jobber’) in the fall of 1869 – 1872
Retired 1872
Succeeded by son, H. MCGREEVEY who still continues in business (1905)
Page 39

MCINTYRE
MATHES & MCINTYRE
Wholesale business at 108 Dearborn Street 1869
Succeeded by E. G. MCINTYRE in 1870
Burned out 1871
Page 41

MEISTERLING, Henry
(See also Henry MESTERLING (page 91) could be same person?)
Bought out wagon jobbers business of Austin WEBB’S son May 15, 1893
Sold out to A. E. ABBS & CO. May 1, 1894
Page 51

MEISTERLING, William
Bought out jobbers business of Louis EHEIM March 1, 1893
Page 77

MEISSNER, Hugo
Employed by Adam SCHOTT to handle jobber wagon business
In business for himself July 1878
Still running wagon 1905
Resides at 365 Campbell Avenue 1905
Page 63, 65

MERRILL Brothers
MERRILL, George G.
F. A MERRILL
George was salesman for DAWSON & SHIELDS
George purchased jobbing business of Adolph GEORG 1873
George remained in business until his death in 1881
Succeeded by his brother, F. A. MERRILL
F. A. Merrill sold out to O. H. KRAUSE
Page 37, 57, 81

MERTEL, William
Started in jobbing business 1904
Page 125

MESTERLING, Henry
(See also Henry MEISTERLING, could be same person?)
Bought wagon from J. W. CAMERON July 30, 1893
Sold out jobbing business to V. C. BLAHA August 1903
Page 91, 123

MEYER, A C.
Began jobbing business in 1898
Still in business 1905
Ad: “A. C. MEYER Wholesale Confectioner 2704 Wallace Street, Chicago”
Page 115, 163 (Ad)

MEYER, C. H.
Factory on West Randolph Street near Canal 1857
Sold out to HESS BROS. 1858
Went to work for SASSAMAN & HICKMAN 1858
Page 13, 23

MEYER, Fred W.
Ad: “FRED W. MEYER 4105 Wentworth Ave. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 170 (Ad)

MEYER, Joseph
(See also MYERS, Joseph per page 189)
Sergeant at Arms, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association “…is a well known figure among
the jobbers and is by no means a quiet one, and is about the heaviest man in the business”
1905
Ad: “JOE MEYER, 845 W. Taylor St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 55 (Photo), 95, 158 (Ad), 189

MICHAELS, Charles
Ran a wagon from March 1, 1862 to June 12, 1865
Killed by fire engine June 12, 1865
Page 25

MICHEL, P. H.
Ad: ” P. H. MICHEL, 194 Hastings St., Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 159 (Ad)

MILLER, D. F.
(Note: Described as MILLER, S. F. on page 113)
Sold out jobbing business at 2399 Wilcox Avenue to M. J. RALSON April 18, 1904
Page 113, 125

MILLER, George
GEORGE MILLER & SON
Of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Started manufacturing branch at 199-201 Van Buren, northeast corner of Van Buren and
Franklin Streets, with Charles HAMILL in charge, March 1892
Discontinued branch January 1, 1894
Ad: “Geo. Miller & Son Co. — All good sellers Violet Chewing gum, four flavors:
Peppermint, Violet, Cachou, Wintergreen — Delicious for Indigestion and breath — Dandy
Chocolate — The best selling penny Chocolate. For sale by all jobbers. Geo. MILLER & SON
CO. 255 S. Third Street Philadelphia”
Page 95, 97. 154 (Ad)

MILLER, S. F.
(Note: described as D. F. MILLER on page 125)
2399 Wilcox Avenue
Began jobbing in 1897
Sold out to M. J. RALSTON April 18, 1904
Page 113, 125

MILLS, D. W.
Eventually a Congressman
Began manufacturing at 30 West Lake Street
“Abandoned business for politics wherein he was more successful.” 1873
Page 43

MOENCH, August
Bought route from Joseph WIEDERKEHR and began jobbing business at 138 Sigel Street 1902
Page 121

MOENICH, L. A.
Ad: “L. A. MOENICH 254 Jansen Avenue Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 142 (Ad)

MOHR, Joseph
“Started manufacturing candy in a small way in a shop on South Water Street near Wells
Street and on the north side 1837-1839
Page 9, 11

MONAHAN CHOCOLATE CREAM CO.
Began manufacturing at 363 Division in 1903
Page 121

MORAN
MORAN & STOUT, confectioners at Randolph Street near Jefferson Street 1854
Page 13

MORAN, Edward
Partnered with S. R. JEFFERSON in buying out Charles SASSAMAN (formerly at 39 Randolph
Street) and became S. R. JEFFERSON & CO. moving to 92 West Randolph Street 1865
Retired and was succeeded by James Reed 1866
Page 15, 35

MORGAN
Bought out S. R. JEFFERSON’S share of business at 159 South Clark Street, which moved to
48 West Randolph St. and went out of business following year 1868-1869
Page 35

MORRIS, Ernest A.
Partnered with John GERTENRICH and Theodore GOTTMANN, all former employees of M SHIELDS &
CO., in confectionery manufacturing business called E. A. MORRIS & CO at 194 South Clinton
Street March 25, 1887
Moved to 85 West Jackson Street 1888
Factory moved to 158 West Jackson Street and changed name to MORRIS & GOTTMAN 1894
Sold out interest in firm to Martin C. KRETCHMER 1903
Page 83, 123

MORRIS, Geo.
“Jobber” 169 State Street 1861
360 West Twelfth Street near Morgan Street 1900
Page 25

MORSE, A. G.
(Note: Per Ad on page 128 is A. G. MORSE, on page 117 is A. C. MORSE)
Began manufacturing at 197 South Canal 1896
Began manufacturing 17-19 River 1900
Ad: “Our specialty “Getting Repeat Orders” — A full line of chocolates and bon bons in
fancy packages and 5 lb. Boxes. Large assortment of 5 and 10 cent packages. MORSE’S Good
Eating Specialties — Satin finished hard candy. A. G. MORSE CO, Chicago.”
Page 111, 117, 130 (Ad)

MORSE, Andrew C.
(Note: Per Ad on page 128 is A. G. MORSE, on page 117 is A. C. MORSE)
Began manufacturing at 197 South Canal 1896
Began manufacturing 17-19 River 1900
Ad: “Our specialty “Getting Repeat Orders” — A full line of chocolates and bon bons in
fancy packages and 5 lb. Boxes. Large assortment of 5 and 10 cent packages. MORSE’S Good
Eating Specialties — Satin finished hard candy. A. G. MORSE CO, Chicago.”
Page 111, 117, 130 (Ad)

MOSS, Walter
Partnered with MURPHY in MOSS & MURPHY 1875
Bought out MURPHY 1877
Partnered with Charles SASSAMAN in SASSAMAN & MOSS, 200 Clark Street
Sold out to SASSAMAN 1880
Page 15, 59

MUELLER, August P.
Bought out jobbing business of Wilhelm REIDERBACH 1896
Still jobbing 1905
Ad: “Aug. MUELLER, 780 N. Winchester Av., Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 113, 134 (Ad)

MUELLER, John
Ad: “The JOHN MUELLER LICORICE CO., 2117-2119-2121-2123 Reading Road, Cincinnati,
Manufacturers of “Famous” LICORICE Specialties (12 types listed) — OUR LATEST NOVELTIES:
(7 listed)”
Page 167 (Ad)

MUGGERDITIAN, V
Partnered with V. G. GUARINIAN (from Constantinople, Turkey), to manufacture Fig paste and
other Turkish Candies. “Started in one small room 20 X 40 Feet at 207 South Canal Street
and in March 1896 was incorporated as the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.”
Moved to 249 South Jefferson Street 1897
Moved to 206 Illinois Street 1899
Moved to 198 and 200 South Center Avenue with plant of 12,000 square feet 1902
Page 99

MULL, George S.
Started in jobbing business in June 1894
A past officer of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Resides at: 4521 Evans Avenue 1905
Page 107

MULLARKEY, W. E.
1267 Jackson Boulevard
Began in jobbing business by buying out T. A. CHAPMAN March 1905
Page 125

MULVANEY, Simon
Employed as city salesman by DAWSON & SHIELDS November 1 – 1871 – 1875
Started own business 1875
Sold out business to Matt OWENS 1878
Page 51

MULVEY, John R.
Bought out A. M. GROVE in January (in early 1890’s?)
Doing large business 1905
Past President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
“a very forcible speaker, always holding the attention of his audience, and is a great
traveler, having traveled for many years in different parts of the globe.”
Ad: “J.R. MULVEY 1360 W. 74th St. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 97, 142 (Ad)

MURBACH
The MURBACH COMPANY
Baltimore, Maryland
Ad: “Have you ever tasted one of Murbach’s Whipped Creams? (drawing of box of chocolates)
If you have, you know why they are the GREATEST CHOCOLATE SPECIALTY in the world. Let us
mail you a sample. THE MURBACH COMPANY, Baltimore, Maryland.”
Page 158 (Ad)

MURPHY
WAYMAN & MURPHY
Manufacturers and Dealers in Carriages, Wagons and Trucks
Randolph & Sangamon Streets
Repairing, Painting We make a specialty of Mfg. Candy Wagons
Page 72

MURPHY, Joseph B.(Doctor)
Bought out SASSAMAN’S interest in SASSAMAN & MOSS and, partnered with Walter MOSS, firm
became MOSS & MURPHY at 200 Clark Street 1872
Bought out MOSS’ interest and partnered with Charles SASSAMAN in SASSAMAN & MURPHY at 200
Clark Street 1873
Murphy’s share bought out by John HUTCHINSON 1879
Sold out to Walter MOSS and returned to old profession (Doctor?) 1877
Page 15, 59

MYERS, Joseph
(See also MEYER, Joseph per all pages but 189)
Sergeant at Arms, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association “…is a well known figure among
the jobbers and is by no means a quiet one, and is about the heaviest man in the business”
1905
Ad: “JOE MEYER, 845 W. Taylor St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 55 (Photo), 95, 158 (Ad), 189
NATHAN BROS.
Begins manufacturing at 434 South Halsted 1902
Page 119

NATHAN, M.
M. NATHAN & CO.
Bought out H. ALEXANDER & CO., were burned out and did not resume business about 1871
Page 41

NATIONAL CANDY CO.
Bought out GEORGE & CHARLES at 108 and 110 West Adams Street
Absorbed the plants of: TORMOEHLEN & BRO. at 106 West Adams, J.K. FARLEY MFG. CO at 104
East Indiana, and LYON & CO. at 51 South Union Street in 1903
Affiliated with (or bought out) the J. K. FARLEY FACTORY at 118 to 130 East Superior Street
1905
Page 43, 44 (Ad), 97, 121

NATIONAL LICORICE COMPANY
Ad: “Compliments of NATIONAL LICORICE COMPANY, 106-116 John Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Young and Smylies Pure Stick Licorice, “ACME” Licorice Pellets”
Page 92

NEEMES, John C.
Born in Poultney, Vermont 1839
Emigrated to Chicago 1856
Manager of C. W. SANFORD’s business at 38 Randolph Street (“…under his able management the
business grew steadily”) 1865
On SANFORD’S death, partnered with Geo. H. Brooks in BROOKS & NEEMES January 1, 1871
Burned out October 9, 1871
Resumed business at Lake and Peoria Streets 1871
Did a very large business and moved to 28 and 32 Michigan Ave January 1, 1874
Sole Owner of JOHN NEEMES & CO. when BROOKS retires January 1, 1878
Joined by partners Mark S. VANDUZEN and William LIEMERT 1878 – January 1, 1892
Employed Frank PILGRIM 1893 – 1896
Edward F. HOLMES buys VANDUZEN and LIEMERT’S interest.
Firm fails January 10, 1897
Accepted the Chicago agency for E. GREENFIELD’S SON & CO. of New York in February 1897
Died “…of cancer of the stomach, after a lingering illness of several months, leaving a
wife and four children” March 16, 1902
Children: Mrs. John V. BERG, John C. NEEMES, Jr., Mrs. John E. COLEMAN, Mrs. Samuel E.
HIBBEN
“…a pioneer in the confectionery business and was known throughout the United States.”
Page 13, 29, 31, 37

NEUBAUER, R
Sold jobbing business to Martin SCHROEDER 1894
Page 109

NEWHALL, F.
Began manufacturing candy at 9 Clark Street 1854
Page 13

NEWHALL, H.
Began manufacturing candy at 75 Randolph Street 1854
Page 13

NOBLE, Frank R.
Began jobbing in October 1888
Was at one time Secretary of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Sold out his business to become a park policeman
Page 87

NORRIS, D. W.
Began manufacturing chewing gum 1894
Now does a large and profitable business 1905
Ad: “NORRIS’ BLUE RIBBON CHEWING GUM
(Photo of NORRIS) BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. It’s all the rage. Nothing has ever been produced
to equal or compare with it. It aids digestion, sweetens the breath, preserves the teeth,
clears the voice and quiets the nerves. Recommended by all singers and public speakers to
be the best and purest in the market. Try it you will be pleased. BLUE RIBBON CHEWING
GUM. Made in five flavors: Pepsin, Min, Blood Orange, Licorice, Cinnamon. (Four stanza
poem, the first letters of which spell out “Use Blue Ribbon Gum”) Use Blue Ribbon Gum, its
merits try, Strictly pure, none better you can buy, Everywhere today this favorite brand is
seen. — Blue Ribbon, monarch reigns supreme, Look where you will, go where you may,
Unequal for flavor Blue Ribbon is today Envy of competitors, by D. W. Norris sold —
Remember Blue Ribbon is worth its weight in gold, In all first class stores, do not forget,
Best and largest, Blue Ribbon Gum you can get, Boys’ delight, ladies friend, mankind’s
guide, Old and young chewers it has satisfied, No grit or dirt in Blue Ribbon Gum you’ll
find. — Get the best, bear D. W. Norris’ Gum in mind, Upon uniform quality you always
can rely, Make up your mind, Blue Ribbon is the Gum to buy. THE BEST GUM ON EARTH. Sold in
Restaurants and Stores Everywhere. Made only by D.W. Norris Milwaukee and Chicago.”
Two page advertisement with poem and photo
Pages 60 – 61 (Ad/Photo of Norris), 111

OATMAN, E. J.
OATMAN, F. G.
Began manufacturing candy as OATMAN BROS. PASTE & CARAMEL CO., at 204 Illinois 1897
Purchased the FRYE CARAMEL COMPANY at 207 Illinois Street “under execution” from George V.
FRYE January 18, 1897
“There was considerable litigation over the matter and pending a decision the plant was
closed down. The parties who were interested in the controversy and who were stockholders
were George V. FRYE, E. J. OATMAN, F. G. OATMAN, Frederick BROWNING and George B. SCRIPPS.
Page 89, 113

ODLIN
WICHELMANN & ODLIN
Started manufacturing homemade candies and popcorn at 148 Dearborn Street.
Moved to 273 Madison Street in 1868
Burnt out in Great Fire October 9, 1871
Page 35

OEHLER, Gustav A.
(Note on page 111 listed as Gustav O. Oehler, in ad on page 158, listed as Gustav A.).
Began in the jobbing trade October 1 1894
Has quite a good business 1905
Ad: “G. A. OEHLER, Jobbing Confectioner, 3511-3513 S. Paulina Street”
Resides at: 3511 South Paulina Street
Page 111, 158 (Ad)

OGDEN SHOEING SHOP
STOKES, J.
Ad: “I warrant good, honest work, OGDEN SHOEING SHOP, J. STOKES, Practical Horseshoes, All
diseases of the feet successfully treated, 53 Ogden Ave., Near Polk St.”
Page 170 (Ad)

OLIVER, Lucien S.
Started as jobber, but didn’t remain long in business (late 1800’s)
Page 51

OLSON, L.
Bought out O. ARVOLDT’S jobbing business
L. OLSON, 1620 North Humboldt Street, started in business succeeding O. ARVOLDT in March
1904
Ad: “Wholesale Confectioner, 1620 Humboldt Street” 1905
Page 80 (Ad), 123, 125

The ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.
Ad: “V. G. GURINIAN, Pres. And Treas.; A. B. GURINIAN, Secy, THE ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING
CO., Established 1889, CONFECTIONERS, Makers of Specialties (12 listed) Send for samples
and quotations. 198-200 South Center Avenue, Chicago.”
Emigrated from Constantinople, Turkey to Chicago May 1, 1892
Partnered with V. MUGGERDITIAN to manufacture Fig paste and other Turkish Candies.
“Started in one small room 20 X 40 Feet at 207 South Canal Street and in March 1896 was
incorporated as the ORIENTAL MANUFACTURING CO.”
Moved to 249 South Jefferson Street 1897
Moved to 206 Illinois Street 1899
Moved to 198 and 200 South Center Avenue with plant of 12,000 square feet 1902
Page 99, 167 (Ad)

OWENS, Matt
Bought out business of Simon MULVANEY 1878
Sold out to M. C. KRETCHMER
Restarted own business still continuing in 1905
Page 51

PAGE, Albert
(See Milton E. PAGE, Sr., father)

PAGE, Francis Virginia
(See Milton E. PAGE, Sr., father)

PAGE, Laura O.
(See Milton E. PAGE, Sr., father)

PAGE, Milton E. Sr.
Son of Samuel Page, an early Chicago settler, who arrived in 1833 from Maine, dying in 1849
PAGE, Mrs. Milton E. (Dora St. GEORGE)
Children: Milton E. PAGE, Jr., Walter Henry, Albert G., Laura O., and Francis Virginia.
Milton E. born in Maine in 1832
Originally carpenter
Married Dora ST. GEORGE of Milwaukee 1868
Joined wife’s successful retail confectionery trade at 180 Clark Street, southwest corner
of Monroe (where Ft. Dearborn building now stands (“now” = 1905)) 1864
Opened factory at 117 South Water street continuing retail trade at 180 Clark St. 1866
Gave up retail to devote time to manufacturing 1869
Factory burned 1867 and restarted immediately at same locale as M. E. PAGE & CO. (no
partner)
Moved to 23, 33, 24 Michigan Ave. and partnered with Rufus P. PATTISON January 1, 1869
Burned out second time May 1871
Rebuilt and were burned out again in “Great Fire” October 9, 1871
Resumed business at 55 South Green Street until January 1, 1874
Moved to 211 and 213 East Lake Street January 1, 1874
Dora ST. GEORGE Page died January 25, 1885 leaving five children: Milton E. PAGE, Jr.,
Walter Henry, Albert G., Laura O., and Francis Virginia.
Employed I. F. DICKSON prior to 1887
Another fire damages new factory and business failed Summer 1890
Formed a stock company, M. E. Page Confectionery Company August 18, 1890
“In the meantime, Mr. Page had withdrawn considerable of his captial to invest in green
houses which he was interested in on the northwest side and this business not proving
profitable he lost most of his frotune, which at one time was quite large. Mr. Page had no
connection to the new corporation except in name.”
Officers of new company: Josiah CRATTY, President; Thos. J. BOLGER, Vice President; Stanley
W. DAVIS, Secretary; and John J. ZIMMERMAN, Treasurer
Stock Company failed August 17, 1897
Milton E. Page, 73, running a plantation opposite Ft. Morgan, Alabama 1905
Page 14 (Photo), 31, 33, 85

PAGE, O.
Emigrated from Boston, where he had been in confectionery trade, to Chicago 1856
“Mr. Page brought out some new things, among them being what was known as pipe and star
candy. This candy was made in the form of pipes and stars with a hole through the stick,
was hard and brittle and flavored with peppermint, wintergreen and cloves. It met with a
ready sale from the start.”
Partnered with O.G.B. SLEEPER in O. PAGE & CO. in a store at 17 Clark Street under St.
Charles Hotel and a factory in alley at the rear of McVicker’s theater 1856
J. B. HENNIGAN acted as foreman
Sold out to J. B. HENNIGAN Fall 1858
Page 21, 23

PAGE, Walter Henry
(See Milton E. Page, Sr., father)

PAGE, Samuel
(See Milton E. Page, son)

PAN CONFECTION COMPANY
225-227 Kinzie
Began as wholesale and manufacturing concern 1892
Page 95

PAPE, C.
Started in business at 4133 Forrest Avenue in April 1870
Sold out tools and stock to William Tormoehlen in October 1877
Page 43

PAPPENTHEIN, A.
Bought out jobbing business of Frank GLEMBOW 1894
Page 107

PARMAN, F. C.
(See also PARMAN, John E., may be brothers?)
Bought out wagons of Charles H. HARRINGTON of HARRINGTON & CO. August 12, 1893
Sold out to George Walter 1894
Ad: “PARMAN BROS. & ZECH, 2915-17 North Hermitage Avenue, Ravenswood, Illinois. Jobbers of
all the Better Makes of Chocolates and High Grade Candies”
Page 80 (Ad), 97, 109

PARMAN, John E.
(See also PARMAN, F. C., may be brothers?)
PARMAN, Mrs. John E., member of the Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners
Association when first formed March 1, 1905
“Succeeded Frederick HOFFMAN in the jobbing business…” September 1894
“Now of the firm PARMAN BROS. & ZECH, 2719 North Hermitage Street” (note: address in ad is
2915-17 page 80) 1905
Ad: “PARMAN BROS. & ZECH, 2915-17 North Hermitage Avenue, Ravenswood, Illinois. Jobbers of
all the Better Makes of Chocolates and High Grade Candies” 1905
Bought out jobbing business of Frederick HOFFMAN Sept. 1, 1895
“now of the firm PARMAN BROS. and ZECH, 1719 North Hermitage Avenue.”
Page 78 (Mrs. PARMAN Group Photo), 80 (Ad), 89, 109, 123, 125

PATTISON, Rufus
Purchased an interest in firm of M. E. PAGE & CO. at 20, 22, and 24 Michigan Avenue January
1, 1869
Burned out May 1871
Immediately rebuilt and burned out for third time in Great Fire of October 9, 1871
Resumed business at 55 South Green Street until January 1, 1874
Moved to 211 and 213 East Lake Street January 1, 1874
Seriously damaged by fire Summer 1890
Business failed shortly thereafter
Page 31, 33

PECKHAM, O. H.
O. H. PECKHAM & CO. St. Louis, Mo.
Employed Frank FIELD of Chicago as foreman until his death 1883 – 1895
Page 65

PELLES, Henry L.
Bought jobbers route from J. Merton CASE March 1881 and still in business 1905
Financial Secretary, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and member of the finance
committee in charge of the national convention, “…is an old jobber, starting in business in
March 1881, who has been repeatedly elected to the office that he holds. He is one of the
best story-tellers in the entire body and is of very pleasing personality. Mr. Pelles is
commonly known as “Shorty” by his friends which are numerous.” 1905
Ad: “H. L. PELLES, Phone Austin 1613, 5819 Chicago Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Residence: 5819 Chicago Avenue 1905
Page 46 (Photo), 67, 75, 95, 134, 187

PEO, Frank R.
Began manufacturing at 5147 Prairie Avenue in March 1903
Ad: “FRANK R. PEO, Jobbing Confectioner, 5147 Prairie Avenue”
Page 121, 134 (Ad)

PEOPLES CANDY CO.
Began manufacturing at 171 West Adams in 1904
Employed Edward H. SCANLAN, Jr., to head city sales May 1888
Page 81, 123

PEOPLES, Frank
Ran a wagon for a few months for Wesley BEECHER (might also be BEECHLER?)
Went into business for himself fall of 1863 -1900
“Quite prominent as a jobber and did a good business.”
First Treasurer of the Confectionery Agents’ Union during its existence 1880
Died November 20, 1900
Page 25, 27, 73

PETERMICHEL,
PETERMICHEL & KIRCHMAN began jobbing candies
KIRCHMAN bought out PETERMICHEL moving to Twelfth Street and Paulina (late 1890’s?)
Page 75

PETERSEN, John
Bought out jobbers business of George O. Evans September 1899
416 West Fifty-First Place
Ad: ” JOHN PETERSEN 416 W. 51st Place Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 117, 142 (Ad)

PETERSON
GREEN & PETERSON
Manufactured candies at 206 South Desplaines Street (early 1890’s?)
Did not remain in business long
Page 97

PETERSON, William
Sold confectionery jobber business to H. J. BENNING April 5, 1894
Page 107

PFEIFFER
BELL & PFEIFFER
With Jonas N. BELL began manufacturing at 40 Fifth Avenue and 612 West Madison in 1901
Page 83, 119

PHILLIPS, Peter
Started out with a wagon jobbing confectionery products 1874
Continued in business intermittently until the time of his death 1904
“Mr. Philips was subject to attack of eye troubles, at which time he was totally blind.”
Page 55

PHOTO Jewelry Mfg. Co.
Ad: “For ADVERTISING NOVELTIES, Badges, Buttons, Celluloid Boxes, for Confections — Write
— PHOTO JEWELRY MFG. CO. 464 Carroll Ave., Chicago”
Page 186 (Ad)

PILGRIM, Frank
Born in Holland 1835
Emigrated at early age initially settling in Detroit, Mich., where he partnered with his
brother in candy manufacturing.
“Becoming impressed with the possibilities in Chicago,” moved to Chicago and opened factory
at 636 West Lake Street 1865
Partnered with V. VAN MARECK, a fellow countryman, renamed firm PILGRIM & VAN MARECK and
moved to 134 West Randolph Street January 1, 1868
When VAN MARECK retired, moved business to 256 Milwaukee Ave. 1870 – May 1, 1875
Sold out to and went to work for John KRANZ May 1, 1875
Entered employ of Albert CURETON Fall 1888 – 1893
Employed by C. NEEMES & CO. 1893 – 1896
“…a well known figure in the confectionery trade for a number of years. During his
connection with the trade he put upon the market a number of novelties, the most successful
of which was Pilgrim’s Chewing Candy, which had a very large sale at one time.”
Retired 1896
Page 22 (Photo), 35, 37

PIKE, Alpheus H.
Employed by Robert H. FISH as city salesman
Went into jobbing business shortly afterward
First Vice President of the Confectionery Agents’ Union
Vice President Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
“Mr. Pike was a man that always pushed himself forward to assist in anything that was
likely to benefit the business, and was always a consistent opponent of everything that was
unfair.”
Died suddenly in 1893
Page 41, 73

PIRIE
CARSON, PIRIE & CO. purchases lease for building at southeast corner of Aberdeen and
Madison Street, paying Robert H. FISH a bonus of $2500 Winter of 1870
Page 33

PLACK
Sold out jobbing business at 1998 Wilcox Avenue to J. F. KROELL April 18, 1904
Page 125

PLATTNER, Fred J.
Bought out jobbing business of J. K. GUNNING 1894
Page 107

PLOOG, Rheinhold
Jobber who died in 1896
Page 79

PLOTTKE, John
Began jobbing “this year”
Runaway horse so damages wagon that he goes out of business 1876
Page 57

PLOWS
Began as PLOWS & CO. a wholesale and manufacturing company at 346 Wabash in 1893
Succeeded by PLOWS MFG. CO. at same address in 1903
Page 99, 121

POOLEY
SPIRRO POOLEY
26 North Clark
Began as wholesale and manufacturing concern 1892
Page 95

PUZZO
PUZZO & BACCIGALUPI
Began manufacturing cocoanut goods on Chicago Avenue near Wells Street
Burned out in Great Fire
Resumed and did some business until 1873
Page 47

PYCKE
Partnered with R. W. DYBALL, formerly of Chicago, as PYCKE BROS. & DYBALL in Omaha,
Nebraska 1883
Page 53

QUAKER CITY CHOCOLATE & CONFECTIONERY CO.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Ad: “Try out Winners (lists candy selection and prices) Our sparkling gloss hard goods are
the best on earth (lists various hard candy flavors)”
Page 126 (Ad)

RADERMACHER, L. R.
Had been connected with bakery business and added a large stock of candy and materially
incrased his sales 1893
His trade was to a large extent in the suburbs
Owing to ill health sold out and moved to Los Angeles, California, where he is in jobbing
business at 233 West Twenty-eighth Street 1905
Page 103

RAKOW, Henry F.
Ad: “607 W. Superior St. Wholesale confectioner”
Page 135 (Ad)

RALSTON, M. J.
2300 Wilcox Avenue
Bought out jobbing business from S. F. MILLER April 18, 1904
(Note: MILLER described as “D.F.” rather than “S. F.” on page 125)
Ad: “M. J. RALSTON 2300 Wilcox Avenue, Confectioner”
Page 113, 125, 182 (Ad)

RECHTMEYER, A
Began jobbing business in April (late 1880’s?)
Sold out to Henry SCHUMACHER in March 1888
Page 83, 89

RECHTMEYER, H.
Began jobbing business in September
Sold out his route to William HAGEMEISTER to go into real estate Feb. 3, 1886
Page 81, 83

REED, Eugene O.
EUGENE O. READ COMPANY
Began the manufacturing of butterscotch specialties at 508 Nelson Street 1896
Moved to Wellington and Clybourn Avenues
Eugene O. REED is the Senior partner
Past President Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Current President National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
Chairman Transportation Committee
Mrs. Eugene O. Reed was member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners’ Association when first formed March 1, 1905
“During the short time he has been in business, he has done more to promote harmony than
any other man in the confectionery trade, and is well known all over the United States.”
Ad: “We have often heard it stated that there is a sucker born every minute, and while we
do not admit this, we are not in a position to say that thre is no truth in it. If this
statement is true, it means that 1440 suckers enter this world of sorrow every day, or at
the rate of about 500,000 per year, and under these circumstances, we see how it is
possible for a man to sell and continue selling an article with little or no merit,
provided he sees a new on each time.
We have an article of merit and are looking for a new trade, but we can offer you as
references any one who ever handled our “REED’S BUTTER SCOTCH PATTIES.” In regard to this
article, we say without fear of contradiction that it is the nicest and most convenient
size on the market, that it will come up with the requirements of any Food Law of any State
or Country, and that it is a Butter Scotch pure and simple, as it contains no foreign
flavoring or coloring matter whatever. It is packed only in air-tight and dust-proof glass
and tine packages, and is put on the market in the fall as soon as the weather is cool
enough, and we guarantee it in every way through the season until the following May. Ask
any one who has ever handled or eaten this popular confection, and order them through your
jobber and give them a trial. Satisfaction guaranteed. When you order be sure you ask for
“REED’S BUTTER SCOTCH PATTIES.” Eugene O. REED Company, (Inc.) Chicago.”
Page 66 (Photo), 111, 125, 166 (Ad)

REED, James
Acquired interest of Edward MORAN and partnered with S. R. JEFFERSON in JEFFERSON & REED at
159 South Clark Street 1866
Partnered with MORGAN and moved business to 48 West Randolph Street 1868
Business closed 1869
Page 35

REIDENBACH, William
Bought out jobbing business of Otto W. LOERCKE 1894
(Could also be same person as Wilhelm REIDERBACH – page 113?)
Page 107

REIDERBACH, Wilhelm
(Could also be same person as William REIDENBACH on page 107?)
Sold jobbing business to August P. MUELLER September 1, 1896
Page 113

REYNOLDS
KERR & REYNOLDS
70 North Clark Street
Page 13

RITTERBUSCH, William H.
Began jobbing in late 1880’s and still in business in 1905
Page 85

ROBERTS, M. L.
Employed by R. H. FISH
Bought out FISH’S horse and wagon route and continued business until 1884
Sold out to L. H. KESSLER 1884
Page 57

ROESCHMANN & JONANOVICH
Began manufacturing at 171 South Desplaines 1901
Page 119

ROKOW, Henry F
Bought out jobbing business of August SCHUMANN November, 1900
607 West Superior Street
On Reception Committee of Convention (Jobbing Confectioners’ Association) 1905
Page 117

ROMINGER
SCHMAUS & ROMINGER
Started small business at 113 Blue Island Avenue and closed same year
Page 63

RORABACK
FOWLER & RORABACK renamed FOWLER & STEIN at 102 West Adams in 1903
Page 121

ROSCOUTEN, Robert
Began in jobbing business 1894
“…now attending to the city department of WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN” 1905
Page 111

ROSS. Henry
Began jobbing business in 1894
Page 109

ROTH, C.
Began manufacturing at 83 Blue Island Avenue May 1873
Bought out by Peter WEBER
Page 53

ROTH, Frank
Assumed business of L. LOBETHAL (Note: spelled “LOBENTHAL” on page 97) who died August 3,
1892
Resides at 229 Johnson Avenue 1905
Page 79, 97

ROTTGEN, H. H.
An ex-policeman, began in the jobbing trade in May 1894
Well known in the trade while he remained in business
Page 107

RUBEL, I. A.
RUBEL, B. F.
G. ALLEGRETTI partnered with I.A. RUBEL and B. F. RUBEL and changed name of company at 179
State Street from ALLEGRETTI & CO. to ALLEGRETTI & RUBEL 1899
RUBEL & ALLEGRETTI opened a wholesale department at 53 Lake Street 1901
Page 115, 119

RUECKHEIM BROS.
F. W. and Louis RUECKHEIM
(See also Herman RUECKHEIM, a possible relation?)
Brothers, F. W. and Louis, began manufacturing “in a humble way as manufacturers of popcorn
products” 1871
Manufactured candy only when they employed Cal BOYNTON, “an expert in inventing new and
salable confections” 1875
Had 4 wagons on the road and “quite a business” with wagon jobbers 1875
Opened factory at 98 Van Buren Street under the name of F.W. RUECKHEIM & BRO.
Moved to larger quarters at West Van Buren, near Canal 1880
Burned out 1885
Employed M. CAPP as city salesman about 1885
Restarted factory at 266 and 268 South Clinton Street 1886
Moved to 261 and 265 South Desplaines Street and brought out “Cracker Jack” 1895
Brought out their favorite confection, “Nut Cracker Jack, ” January 1897
Needing more space, rented store at 316 South Clinton Street 1897
Partnered with Paul FERNALD, who retired next year 1898
Partnered with Henry G. ECSTEIN and became RUECKHEIM BROS. & ECKSTEIN in 1903
Erected mammoth new factory at northwest corner of Peoria and Harrison 1904
“The Rueckheim brothers are probably as widely known throughout the United States as any
persons connected with the confectionery business in Chicago and while today their business
is a vast one, their beginning was quite small and it was only their persistent and hard
work, combined with the exceptional quality of the goods which they have always
manufactured, that has placed them where they are today.
F. W. Rueckheim and his brother, Louis, began business in a humble way as
manufacturers of pop corn products in 1871. They did not manufacture candy until about
1875, when they were so fortunate as to secure the services of Cal BOYNTON, who was an
expert in inventing new and salable confections. In 1875, they had four wagons on the road
and had quite a business, as well, with the wagon jobbers. In 1879 they opened a factory
at 98 Van Buren Street under the firm name of F. W. RUECKHEIM & BROS.. In 1880 their
business had so increased that larger quarters became a necessity, and accordingly they
moved to West Van Buren Street, near Canal, and were burned out there in 1885. In 1886 the
factory was restarted at 266 and 268 South Clinton Street. In 1895 they moved to 261 and
265 South Desplaines street and in this year they brought out their favorite confection,
“Cracker Jack,” which today is probably the greatest selling pop corn product in the world.
In January 1897, they brought out the little brother to “Cracker Jack,” known as “Nut
Cracker Jack.”
Ad: (Photo of young girl pointing to box of “Cracker Jack” and text that reads? “Though
many seek to imitate, With style and name of close relate, The taste is what all others
lack — It’s only found in “Cracker Jack.” RUECKHEIM BROS. & ECKSTEIN, Cracker jack and
Candy Makers, Chicago, USA. A full line of staple goods, chocolates, penny goods and pail
specialties. Write for samples and prices.”
Page 24 (Ad), 49, 51, 79, 121, 123

RUECKHEIM, Herman
(See also Louis and F. W. RUECKHEIM, possible relations?)
Began manufacturing at 685 Forty-third Street 1900
Page 117

RUMSFELT, D.
RUMSFELT, John
Was jobber from July 1, 1889 to October 5, 1896
His brother, John RUMSFELT, was also in the business from December 1, 1889 to May 1, 1892
Page 89

RUNKEL
RUNKEL BROTHERS
Ad: “RUNKEL BROTHERS Crème de Milk Chocolate, A Delicious Confection, Best 5 cent Package
Made. Write for sample and price.”
Page 96 (Ad)

RUPPERT. J
Bought a jobbing business from Max KIRCHMAN 1894
Page 109

RUSH, Andy
Ad: “ANDY RUSH Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 151 W. Jackson Boulevard, Bet. Halsted and
Desplaines, Chicago”
Page 134 (Ad)

RUSSELL BROTHERS
“Manufactured a few kinds of candy, but did not remain long in business and had several
locations in the few months of the firm’s existence.” (1890’s?)
Page 91

SACHER, Paul
Began manufacturing at 110 Erie in 1901
Page 119

SAFFORD, Henry K.
Manufacturer at 47 Clark Street
Page 25

SAGE, Henry W.
Conducted both a jobbing and manufacturing business selling out in 1894
Started manufacturing in Terre Haute, Indiana, where still located 1905
Page 95

SANDERSON, D. W.
Began a factory at 301 West Madison Street 1899
Moved to Ft. Dodge, Iowa shortly after
Page 117

SANFORD, C. W.
Native of Ottawa, Illinois, where “he carried on quite a business as a
manufacturer…shipping his product to all the small towns of Illinois and Missouri. At this
time competition was very keen in the candy business.” Mr. Sanford soon found he was
losing trade to Chicago merchants, as the dealers in small towns preferred to make
occasional trips to Chicago to buy their goods, rather than purchase them from a
manufacturer in a small town like Ottawa. In the early spring of 1863, he therefore
packed up his stock on hand, his kettles and tools and shipped them to Chicago.” 1863
Relocated to Chicago Spring of 1863
179 Randolph Street 1863
Employed Charles Frederick GUNTHER as traveling salesman
38 Randolph Street May 1, 1865
Employed John C. NEEMES as manager
Employed Adolph GEORG 1864 near Briggs House and new building erected for steam powered
candy factory and store “largest establishment up to that time which had been erected for
candy-making purposes”
First Chicago candy manufacturer to use steam power and introduced terra alba into goods.
Died Fall of 1870
Business assumed by BROOKS & NEEMES
Page 17, 27, 29, 37

SASSAMAN, Charles
Partnered with Francis W. HICKMAN as SASSAMAN & HICKMAN manufacturing candy at 47 Randolph
Street “and made quite a success for a few years” early 1854
Employed William LEIMERT from Philadelphia as firm foreman May 1857
“After LEIMERT was hired as foreman the firm began to turn out new goods. Leimert brought
with him from Philadelphia many new ideas and was the first in Chicago to make cococanut
(sic) cakes, cream goods and bon-bons. Nothing but hard goods were made in Chicago prior
to this time and the majority of manufactures was stick candy.”
Moved to 63 Randolph Street where he employed C. H. MEYER 1858
HICKMAN sold out to Geo. BROOKS and name changed to SASSAMAN & BROOKS 1859
BROOKS retires and SASSAMAN moves to 39 Randolph Street 1861
Sold out to S. R. Jefferson and Edward Moran 1865
SASSAMAN partners with Walter MOSS as SASSAMAN & MOSS and moves to 200 Clark Street 1865
Sold out interest to J. D. MURPHY who partners with Walter MOSS as MOSS & MURPHY1875
Buys out MOSS’ share and re-partners with MURPHY in SASSAMAN & MURPHY at 200 Clark Street
1873
Partners with John HUTCHINSON who bought out Murphy and renames firm SASSAMAN & HUTCHINSON
1879
Bought out by HUTCHINSON
Partners with Walter MOSS and then buys out his interest 1880
Page 13, 15, 59

SASSO, Paul
Began jobbing in February (late 1880’s?)
Continued until his death
William Weis succeeded him in business on May 19, 1890
Page 85, 91

SAUL, John
Began manufacturing at northwest corner of Green and West Lake Streets with two wagons on
the road
Remained in business until July 1, 1875
Went to Sacramento, California to continue business
Page 45

SAUMWEBER, George
Began jobbing business in 1894
Sold wagon to Luther COUMBE 1894
Sold out in 1903
Page 107, 109

SCANLAN, Edward H.
(Relative of Transcriber – Please contact TCALLANET@aol.com for more information and photos
– Note: Edward H., Mortimer and John F. Scanlan were brothers, who emigrated from
Castlemahon (Mahoonagh), New Castle West, Limerick, with their widowed mother, Katherine
Roche Scanlan (Mrs. Mortimer Scanlan) in 1848-50 to Chicago. Edward H. Scanlan, Jr., was
son of Edward H. Sr. — brother of Frank Thomas Scanlan, my husband’s grandfather.)
Clerked for J. P. HETH Clinton Street near Madison 1854
Opened factory at 109 North LaSalle Street 1855
Added retail store 18 South Clark Street 1858
Moved Factory to 172 North Wells Street 1860
Partnered with P. L. GARRITY in “THE GREAT WESTERN CANDY FACTORY” 1861
Moved office and factory to 47 State Street 1864
Dissolved GARRITY partnership and joined brothers, Michael and Mortimer, in SCANLAN & BROS.
at 138 South Water Street 1866
Mortimer SCANLAN retires and John SCANLAN joins Edward and Michael in SCANLAN & BROS. 1866
Partners with P. L. GARRITY again at 23 Lake Street 1879-1880
Page 10 (photo), 17, 19

SCANLAN, Edward H. Jr.
(Relative of Transcriber – Please contact TCALLANET@AOL.COM for more information and
photos)
Son of Edward H. SCANLAN Sr. (who started manufacturing business in 1856)
Began manufacturing candy himself at 154 South Jefferson Street October 9, 1886
Continued manufacturing until May 22, 1888
Quit own business to take charge of city sales of BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR May 22, 1886
Left BUNTE BROS. to take charge of city sales of PEOPLES CANDY COMPANY
Currently attends to jobbing trade at TORMOEHLEN BRANCH, NATIONAL CANDY CO.
Page 81

SCANLAN, John F.
(Relative of Transcriber – Please contact TCALLANET@AOL.COM for more information and
photos)
Partners with brothers, Michael and Mortimer SCANLAN, in firm of SCANLAN & BROS. at 138
South Water Street 1865
Mortimer retires, Edward SCANLAN joins firm 1866
Levi J. COLBURN joins firm which becomes SCANLAN BROS. & COLBURN at 78 State Street 1869
Edward SCANLAN retires and firm becomes SCANLAN & COLBURN 1870
Bought out by COLBURN 1871 and retired
Government office 854 Custom House

SCANLAN, Mortimer
(Relative of Transcriber – Please contact TCALLANET@AOL.COM for more information and
photos)
Partnered with brother, Michael SCANLAN, as SCANLAN & BRO. at 138 South Water Street 1861
Joined by brother, John F. SCANLAN, and became SCANLAN & BROS. 1865
Joined by brother Edward SCANLAN, Mortimer retired 1866
County Clerk’s Office
Page 17, 19

SCHAEFER, Henry E.
Bought out the business of George W. HAWKES in May 1, 1890
Past President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, past representative to the
National Association,
Chairman Reception Committee, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners Association
Sold wagon and route to Michael Betz, 3258 Lowe Avenue March 7, 1904
Ad: “Henry E. SCHAEFER, 353 W. Huron St. Dealer in Fine Confectionery”
Resides at: 353 West Huron Street 1905
Page 71 (photo), 85, 91, 123. 155 (Ad)

SCHAFER, Charles
Began confectionery business at 204 Madison Street November. 1854
Partnered with Geo. H. BROOKS (Manufacturing) as CHAS. SCHAFER & CO at 158 Monroe Street
near La Salle 1858
Moved to 276 Clark Street when BROOKS retired 1858
Abandoned manufacturing and moved to 182 Clark Street (wholesale and retail business) 1863
119 Randolph Street (with R. W. Chappell) 1858
Retired early 1864
Page 13, 15

SCHAFER, Louis
Note: Also spelled SCHAFFER, Louis on page 119 and in Ad on page 135)
Bought out business of Julius GORDON, deceased, December 1, 1901
Ad: “L. SCHAFFER Wholesale Confectioner 60 Hastings St.”
61 Hastings Street
Page 65. 119, 135

SCHAFFER, Louis
Note: Also spelled SCHAFER, Louis on page 65)
Bought out business of Julius GORDON, deceased, December 1, 1901
Ad: “L. SCHAFFER Wholesale Confectioner 60 Hastings St.”
61 Hastings Street
Page 65. 119, 135

SCHENDORF, Henry C.
City salesman for DAWSON & SHIELDS
Began own business 1879-1880
Employed Det STEVENS as a salesman
Sold part of jobbing route to Det Stevens 1888
Became active politically and was elected alderman of the Twenty-second ward
Made a record in the council that the papers did not approve of.
President Jobbers Confectioners’ Association and one of the delegates that formed the
National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1894
Built up several routes and hired men to run them making a fair profit
Trustee of newly formed Confectioners’ Agents’ Union 1880
Finally lost heavily on his many ventures and gradually dropped out of the business
Sold a jobbing confectionery route to Charles WIGHT 1888
Sold route to J. J. SEEBER 1894
Now a farmer 1905
Page 69, 73, 81, 87, 73, 93, 107, 117

SCHEUER, Hans
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

SCHEWE, Otto
Began jobbing business 1894
Now in teaming business 1905
Page 107

SCHINDLER, Paul
Ad: “Paul SCHINDLER Saloon & Restaurant 73 W. Washington St. Near Jefferson”
Page 135 (Ad)

SCHMAUS, Henry
SCHMAUS & ROMINGER
Started a small factory at 113 Blue Island Avenue and closed business same year
Ran a wagon for about two years and gave up business (perhaps late 1800’s)
Page 63

SCHMEISER, J.
Began in jobbing business in 1902
Page 121

SCHMIDT, Peter H.
(Note: also spelled “SCHMITT” on page 63)
City Salesman for John KRANZ November 2, 1876 – July 1, 1881
Went into jobbing business for himself July 1, 1881
Treasurer of Jobbing Confectioners’ Association for several years.
Still in business residing at 1762 South Clifton Park Avenue 1905
Page 63, 93

SCHMITT, Peter H.
(Note also spelled “SCHMIDT” on page 93)
City Salesman for John KRANZ November 2, 1876 – July 1, 1881
Went into jobbing business for himself July 1, 1881
First Treasurer of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners’ Association for several
years.thereafter 1901
Still in business residing at 1762 South Clifton Park Avenue 1905
Ad: “Peter H. SCHMITT 762 S. Clifton Park Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 63, 93, 178 (Ad)

SCHOENHOFF, Ernest
Jobber who sold out to B. LAMA in 1894
Page 79, 109

SCHOTT, Adam
Employed as city salesman and drove wagon for John KRANZ 1876
Drove wagon for BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR 1876
Sold horse, wagon and route to Fred Lindeman in Spring 1878
Partnered with Charles SCHWARZ as SCHWARZ & SCHOTT in Minneapolis 1880
Employed Hugo MEISSNER to handle wagon business
Page 55, 59, 61, 65

SCHOTTMILLER, William
Began jobbing business in March 1886
Sold out to William LANDGRAF in June 1893
Appointed Committee Member to create a national Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1894
Page 83, 93, 103

SCHREIBER, Charles
(See also SCHREIBER, F. W.)
156 Seminary Avenue
Sold out to F.W. SCHREIBER
Page 115

SCHREIBER, F. W.
(See also SCHREIBER, Charles)
156 Seminary Avenue
Began Jobbing 1898
Succeeded Charles SCHREIBER
Page 115

SCHROEDER, Charles
Began business “…at about this time” (perhaps late 1880’s?)
Still in business at 524 North California Avenue 1905
Ad: “Chas. SCHROEDER Dealer in high grade Chocolates 524 N. California Avenue”
Page 79, 135 (Ad)

SCHROEDER, Martin
Twenty-fourth Place and Wentworth Avenue
Began jobbing 1893
Bought out R. NEUBAUER 1894
Sold out to Charles H. KLAUS February 2, 1905
Page 105, 109, 125

SCHUKRAFT, William
Ad: ” Wm. SCHUKRAFT & SONS Wagon Manufacturers and Repairers, 237-239-241 Fulton Street,
Chicago, Illinois”
Page 158 (Ad)

SCHULTZ, H.
H. SCHULTZ & CO. INC
Ad: “H. SCHULTZ & CO., Incorporated Established 1856, 6-16 Superior Street, Fine Candy
Boxes Our Specialty. We also make the best and most durable candy sample Cases and Trays
in the market.”
Page 110 (Ad – drawing of building)

SCHULZ, Julius H.
Employed as city salesman by John KRANZ 1874-1879
Partnered with Albert and Gustav BUNTE and formed BUNTE BROS. & SCHULZ which did a large
business at 184 Indiana Street
Withdrew from firm and formed new firm of BUCHHOLZ BROS. & SCHULZ October 1879
New firm soon dissolved
Purchased route from Albert F. STEGER August 1, 1883
Went into business for self and still is jobbing candies 1905
Ad: “Julius H. SCHULZ Wholesale Confectioner 817 Burling Street”
Page 53, 55, 77, 159 (Ad)

SCHUMACHER, Charles A.
Partnered with John Block under firm name of CHARLES A. SCHUMACHER & CO. at 623 Center
Avenue to manufacture candy Jan. 15, 1888
Moved to Eighteenth and Halsted Streets
Retired to go into ice cream business May 1, 1892
Page 87

SCHUMACHER, Henry
Bought out jobbing business of A. RECHTMEYER and runs wagons March 1888
Manufacturer of the “Foxy Grand Pa Lunch Bag” and Dealer in Fine Confectionery
507 West Huron Street, Chicago
Page 72 (Ad), 83, 89

SCHUMANN, August
Sold jobbing business to Henry F. ROKOW November 1900
Page 117

SCHUPPENHAUER, E. Jr.
Bought out the business of his father July 1892
Still in business 1905
Ad: “E. SCHUPPENHAUER, Jr. 658 Hirsh Street, Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at 658 Hirsch Street 1905
Page 97, 186 (Ad)

SCHUSTER, A. F.
2257 Wilcox Avenue
Wholesale Confectioner
Page 80 (Ad)

SCHWARZ, Charles
Partnered with Charles A. SPOEHR as SPOEHR & SCHWARZ 1877
Went to Minneapolis and partnered with Adam SCHOTT 1880?
Page 55

SCHWEINFURTH, Frank
206 South Park Avenue
Started business in 1878?
Page 51

SCRIPPS, George B.
Described as one of “the parties who were interested in and who were stockholders” involved
in controversial sale by George V. FRYE “under execution” of the FRYE CARAMEL COMPANY at
207 Illinois Street to the OATMAN BROTHERS (E. J. OATMAN and F. G. OATMAN) which resulted
in “considerable litigation.” January 18, 1897
Page 89

SEBASTIAN, Frank A.
288 Elm Street
Bought out jobbing business of August KOESSLER March 20, 1905
Ad: “FRANK SEBASTIAN Jobbing Confectioner 288 Elm St.”
Page 67, 125, 135 (Ad)

SEEBER, John J.
(Note called J. H. SEEBER on page 107)
Began business as a jobber buying route from Henry SCHENDORF in August 1894
Still in business 1905
Sergeant at Arms of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Member of the Entertainment Committee of the national convention
Ad: “John J. SEEBER, Wholesale Confectioner, 16 Francis Place”
Resides at: 16 Francis Place
Page 79, 107, 134 (Ad)

SEELEY, S. M.
Acted as an agent for a number of manufacturing confectioners 18 South Clark 1859-1860
Page 25

SEELIG, A. F.
Began jobbing business in 1898
Sold out in 1900
Page 115

SEELIG, Fred T.
Bought out jobbing business from Philip DREIBUS March 1890
Member of the Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
Ad: “FRED SEELIG, 979 W. Chicago Avenue, Wholesale Confectioner”
979 West Chicago Avenue 1905
Page 77, 93, 134 (Ad)

SEILER, C.
Began jobbing in late 1880’s
Still in business 1905
Page 81

SELIX, J. A.
Began jobbing business at 35 North Center Avenue August 1 1903
Ad: J. A. SELIX, Wholesale Confectioner, 35 South Center Avenue
Page 114 (Ad), 123

SELL, Charles H.
Began bought out jobbing business of Henry WENDELBURG at 3928 Artesian Avenue 1902
Ad: “CHAS. H. SELL, Wholesale Confectioner, 3928 Artesian Avenue”
Page 121, 170 (Ad)

SELTMAN, F. H.
Ad: “F. H. SELTMAN, 1739 Briar Place, Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 155 (Ad)

SENDLINGER, Julius
Bought out S. R. LENZ’ jobbing business at 138 Sigel Street in June 1902
Ad: “Julius SENDLINGER, 138 Siegel St. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 121, 134 (Ad)

SER-VIS MFG. CO.
Began manufacturing at 147 West Jackson 1901
Page 119,

SEVERINGHAUS & BEILFUSS CO., INC.
Printers, Lintotypers, Book Binders and Stationers
448 Milwaukee Ave
566-568 Ogden Ave.
Chicago
Page 72 (Ad)

SHEFCHEK, Joseph
(See also J. SHEFCHEEK and Ad on page 170 – could be same person?)
Started jobbing business in 1902
“…has served on many committees of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association and has been
instrumental in getting up pleasant entertainments.”
Page 121

SHEFCHEEK, J.
(See also Joseph SHEFCHEK page 121 — could be same person)
Ad: “J. SHEFCHEEK, Jobbing Confectioner, Fancy Chocolates, Gums, etc. 6447 Union Avenue”
Page 170 (Ad)

SHEPHERD, C. L.
Began as confectioner 103 Randolph Street 1854
Later went into business with R. W. CHAPPELL at 119 Randolph Street
Page 13

SHERMAN, R. A.
(Note: Could be Roger A. SHERMAN)
Ad: “R. A. SHERMAN, Teacher of Dancing, Residence 3736 Forest Ave. (Member Chicago Jobbing
Confectioners’ Association) Weekly Assemblies at Oakley Hall, 926 Madison St. every
Wednesday and Saturday evening — Delegates to the convention are invited to attend while
in the city, and see a beautiful decorated Hall, exquisite music and all the Lemon Frappe
you can drink.”
Page 151 (Ad/Photo)

SHERMAN, Roger A.
Began in jobbing business 1902
Page 121

SHIELDS, Michael
Born in Chicago “…when the city was an overgrown village, built principally on stilts, and
has grown up with the city.”
Held more political offices than any other confectioner in Chicago — 16 years a member of
the Lincoln Park Board, and 1 1/2 years a member of the Library Boar, now (1905) “filling
second term of 6 years as member of the Board of Education, his term of office expiring
July 1, 1906″
Partnered with Martin DAWSON in DAWSON & SHIELDS at 17 Clark Street 1868-October 9, 1871
(Fire)
Moved to 83 South Green Street 1871
229 Randolph Street 1873-1875
43 and 45 State Street 1875 – 1878
Employed Frank DIBBLE and Frank HUNT as city salesmen
Bought out DAWSON’S interest in partnership 1878
Partners with John B. LANGAN as M. SHIELDS & CO. 1884
Moves to 51-55 South Jefferson Street, “…one of the lightest, if not the lightest, plants
used for a candy factory in Chicago, and installed entirely new machinery. The firm does a
large trade with the jobbers of Chicago.”
Employed E. G. GAVIN 1891
Ad: M. SHIELDS & CO. Manufacturing Confectioners Chicago — Michael SHIELDS and John B.
LANGAN — Makers of Fine Chocolates and Bon Bons Exclusive in Our Brands. Langanelli
Chocolates (Bitter-Sweet) and the United States Mint (Hand Made Lozenge) (other specialties
listed as well). Photo of Michael Shields “Founder of the Oldest Plant in Chicago 1869-
1905″
Page Cover page (Ad/Photo), 23, 51, 65, 95, 103

SHIELDS, Patrick
Began jobbing 1871
After a few years quit to run a hotel
Page 41

SHIELDS, W. N.
Had been a retailer manufacturing for his own trade
Began to sell to jobbers and ran a wagon
Did business in Chicago for several years, finally moving to Austin where he is still in
business 1905
Ad: The Austin Candy Kitchen, W. N. SHIELDS, Prop., Manufacturers and Retailers of
Everything in Candy, 117 North Park Avenue.”
Page 85, 170 (Ad)

SHOTWELL MFG. CO.
Ad: “CHECKERS” Pop Corn Confections, Manufactured exclusively by SHOTWELL MFG. CO>,
Chicago, “Always in Checker Board Packages””
Page 89 (Ad)

SIMM, Frank J.
(See also father, James C. SIMM)
Residence: 3618 Michigan Avenue 1904
Page 21

SIMM, Frank J.
(See James C. SIMM, father)

SIMM, James C.
(father of SIMM, Frank J.)
Born Oban, Scotland 1832
Emigrated to US 1842
92 West Randolph Street (manufacturer) as JAMES C. SIMM & CO. 1856
Moved to 34 West Randolph Street May 1861
Moved to 128 Dearborn Street May 1, 1862
Moved to 42 State Street where he had a “large lucrative business until burned out.” 1870-
October 9, 1871 (Great Fire)
694 Wabash Avenue (leased) 1871
56 State Street 56 State Street
“The first manufacturer to put really fine goods upon the Chicago market.”
Died at home of son, Frank J. Simm, at 3618 Michigan Avenue March 1904
Page 19, 21

SIMON, Joseph
Began jobbing business 1897
Sold out later on
Page 115

SLEEPER, O.G.B.
Partnered with O. Page in confectionery manufacturing business:
“Mr. Page brought out some new things, among them being what was known as pipe and star
candy. This candy was made in the form of pipes and stars with a hole through the stick,
was hard and brittle and flavored with peppermint, wintergreen and cloves. It met with a
ready sale from the start.”
Name of business was O. PAGE & CO. which had a store at 17 Clark Street under St. Charles
Hotel and a factory in alley at the rear of McVicker’s theater 1856
J. B. HENNIGAN acted as foreman
Sold out to J. B. HENNIGAN Fall 1858
Page 21, 23

SLYDER, Albert F.
Entered trade 1876 ?
Became head salesman for John KRANZ
Head salesman for C. F. GUNTHER’S
Began own business for a few months
Took position with BUNTE, FRANK & CO. for several years
Began manufacturing again in 1892 at 3203 Cottage Grove Avenue
After several years sold out the SLYDER CANDY CO. 1898
Page 57, 99. 115

SMITH, B. F.
SMITH & HALE
Partnered with Frank FIELD and Herbert WILLEY in opening bakery and candy factory at 108
West Washington Street, under name of FRANK FIELD & CO. 1878
Moved to 203 East Van Buren Street, corner of Franklin Street, dropped the bakery business
entirely, and confined themselves strictly to candy. 1880
Frank DIBBLE was in charge of the jobbing department 1882
FRANK FIELD & CO candy business went into receivership and bought out by SMITH & HALE 1883
SMITH & HALE failed shortly thereafter
Page 51, 63, 65

SMITH & PETERS
“Clover” (trademark) brand lozenges
“Medicated work a specialty”
Philadelphia
Page 76 (Ad)

SMITH, George W.
Bought out Leonard G. THOMAS and was a jobber of candies and did a stationery and news
business also (late 1890’s?)
Page 97

SMITH, H.R.
H.R. SMITH & BRO. began manufacturing at 1142 West Lake in 1901
Page 119

SMITH, Richard
Began butterscotch business as SMITH-BURNHAM CO. (not corporation) at 195 South Desplaines
Street March 1, 1890
Withdrew from firm April 1892
Opened a factory at 144 North Wood Street Fall 1892
Retired 1894
Page 87

SMITH, Washington
Bought out meat business of Leonard H. THOMAS
Page 59

SPEAR, Robert
On a transfer card from Robert Spear, B.M. COLE bought jobbing business at 3554 Cottage
Grove Avenue from Frank HUNT in November 1902
Page 121

SPIRRO
SPIRRO POOLEY
26 North Clark
Began as wholesale and manufacturing concern 1892
Page 95

SPOEHR, Charles A.
Worked for John KRANZ 1871 – 1876
Partners with Albert and Gustav BUNTE as BUNTE & BROS. & SPOEHR manufacturing candy at 416
State Street in 1876
Principal business selling to wagon jobbers and had two wagons of their own, driven by
Michael KOPP and Adam SCHOTT
Moved to 73 and 74 West Monroe Street March 1885
Employed about 200 employees 1896
Firm dissolved 1877
Partners with Charles SCHWARZ as SPOEHR & SCHWARZ
Repartners with BUNTE Brothers and moves to 83 Market Street
Joined by third Bunte brother, Ferdinand, March 1885
Ad: (Five pages) “BUNTE, SPOEHR & CO., CHICAGO, The leading confectioners — Just a Word
with you, please: We are such unassuming people we fear our modesty has prevented us from
proclaiming to the public, what our customers have known for many years, the fact that our
goods have been the standard of excellence for more than a quarter of a century. That old
adage, “by their work ye shall know them” seemed to be sufficient in former years, but in
these busy days, if we expect to retain the reputation we have held so long, and guarded so
jealously, we must not only make the best Goods, but must let the Dealer and Consumer know
that we are doing so. Lest we weary you, we will speak briefly, not of ourselves, but of a
few of our Candies that have not only helped to establish the reputation of which we are so
proud, but have aided Chicago in achieving the distinction of being the Great Candy Center.
(followed by three pages of candy descriptions) Always look for the Trade mark, and if it
is on the box you will know you are getting the best…..BUNTE, SPOEHR & CO. 139 and 141 West
Monroe St., Chicago. (Tradmark is white “B. S. & Co.” inside a black box, inside a black-
outline white circle
Page 55, 81, 200-205 (Ad)

STACK, August
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

STADTER, William J.
(Note: Also spelled STATTER on page 97)
Bought out M. CAPP in March 1892
Vice-President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
“with a great influence over his associates.”
Ad: “W. J. STADTER 207 24th Place Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 79, 97, 142 (Ad)

STATTER, William J.
(Note: Also spelled STADTER on page 79)
Bought out M. CAPP in March 1892
Vice-President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
“with a great influence over his associates.”
Ad: “W. J. STADTER 207 24th Place Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 79, 97, 142 (Ad)

STEGER, Albert F.
(Note on pages 34 (Photo), 93, and 159 (Ad) spelled STREGER; on page 93 middle initial
appears once as “F.” and once as “J.” On photo appears as “F.”)
1st Vice President, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
First Financial secretary of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners’ Association March 10,
1901
Bought out a route from Julius SCHULZ, August 1, 1883,
Vice President of DREIBUS-HEIM CO. 1899
Ad: “ALBERT STREGER 337 N. Paulina St., Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 34 (Photo), 77, 93, 159 (Ad)

STEIN, Arthur
FOWLER & STEIN at 102 West Adams replaces FOWLER & RORABACK as manufacturer in 1903
ARTHUR STEIN & CO. succeeded FOWLER & STEIN at 102 and 104 West Adams Street 1904
Arthur STEIN turns 10,000 square feet of space on West Adams to CAMERON & MARBACH May 1,
1904
Page 91, 121, 123

STERLING, I. B.
14 Clark Street 1854
Page 13

STERN, Leo
Of Cincinnati, Ohio
First President of newly formed National Jobbing Confectioners’ Association August 1895
Page 93

STEVENS, Det
Had been a salesman for Henry C. SCHENDORF
Bought out part of Henry C. SCHENDORF’S jobbing route in September of 1888
George O. EVANS bought out STEVENS’ business 1889
Died in 1890
Page 87, 117

STEVENS, George H.
Started the CONSOLIDATED CANDY COMPANY at 840 West Van Buren Street 1896
“…was arrested for using the mails for fraudulent purposes and was held in bonds of $2,000.
Stevens advertised for agents, offering to pay $75 per month salary and a commission, but
making each applicant purchase a case of samples at $4, which it is alleged was worth only
50 cents. He denied that he meditated any fraud, but admitted that he had received over
$8,800 from 2, 200 persons answering his advertisements, and of that number 270 canvassed
for orders, and he filled all sent to him.”
Page 111

STEVENS, Wm. R.
Bought out Wm. Chalmer’s interest in L.F. HAEHNLEN & CO. at 83 Michigan Ave. 1877
Sold out to Geo. H. BROOKS 1880
Page 21

ST. GEORGE, Dora
(See also (Mrs.) Milton E. PAGE)
Originally from Milwaukee
Married Milton E. PAGE in 1868
M. E. Page’s “…wife was an active and ambitious woman who had a retail confectionery store
at 180 Clark Street, the southwest corner of Monroe, where the Ft. Dearborn building now
stands. In 1864 she started to manufacture her own candies and succeeded so well that her
husband gave up his business as a carpenter and took up that of candy making.”
Died leaving children: Milton E. Page, Jr., Walter Henry, Albert G., Laura O. and Francis
Virginia January 24, 1885
Page 31, 33

STILLMAN, C. P.
Became partner with MCDONALD BROS. at 206 State Street, changing name to MCDONALD BROS. &
STILLMAN 1876
Page 53

STOKES, J.
OGDEN SHOEING SHOP
Ad: “I warrant good, honest work, OGDEN SHOEING SHOP, J. STOKES, Practical Horseshoer, All
diseases of the feet successfully treated, 53 Ogden Ave., Near Polk St.”
Page 170 (Ad)

STOLLE, Richard
Ad: “Richard STOLLE, 1678 W. 12th Street, Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 142

STOUT & MORAN
Randolph near Jefferson Street 1854
Page 13

STRAUS, Fred H. A.
Jobber in late 1880’s still active in 1905
Treasurer of DREIBUS-HEIM CO. 1899
Ad: “Fred H. STRAUS, 24 Florence Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 77, 79, 155 (Ad)

STREGER, Albert. F.
(Note on page 77 spelled STEGER; on page 93 middle initial appears once as “F.” and twice
as “J.” On photo appears as “F.”)
1st Vice President, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association 1905
First Financial secretary of newly formed Jobbing Confectioners’ Association March 10,
1901
Bought out a route from Julius SCHULZ, August 1, 1883,
Joins DREIBUS-HEIM CO. 1899
Vice President of DREIBUS-HEIM CO., “…prominent in association affairs; was the first
financial secretary of the body; a firm and consistent advocate of every measure to benefit
the trade or promote harmony.” 1905
Ad: “ALBERT STREGER 337 N. Paulina St., Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 34 (Photo), 77, 93, 159 (Ad), 187

STREGER, Fred
Began jobbing this year (1886)
Was in business for about 15 years
Page 83

STRUCK, Charles
454 Oakdale Avenue
Started jobbing business August, 1898
Succeeded L. LARSEN
Member of the Executive Committee of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Ad: “CHAS. STRUCK 454 Oakdale Ave. Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 115, 135

SULLIVAN
GUEST & SULLIVAN (Partner was H. E. GUEST)
Manufacturer before 1894
Page 107

SULLIVAN, D. J.
Began in jobbing business in 1902
Page 121

SUNDERLAGE, George H.
Bought out jobbing business of Joseph HAGEMEISTER in August 1891
Still in business 1905
Ad: “Geo. H. SUNDERLAGE, 19 Hein Place, Jobbing Confectioner”
Resides at: 19 Hein Place
Page 95, 158 (Ad)

SUTER
The LAUER & SUTER CO.
Ad: “We are manufacturers of good eating and good selling Penny Novelties See our sample
Before buying The LAUER & SUTER CO., 1420 to 1431 Philpot Street, Baltimore, Maryland”
Page 147

SWANSON, Albert C.
70 State Street
Began manufacturing in 1886
Page 81

SWARDSTAD, John
Began jobbing business 1894
Remained in business until killed on a railroad seven years later 1901
Page 109

SYLVESTER, S. E.
Started manufacturing at 217 South Halsted and ran wagon until 1864
Went to Canada 1864-1866
Ran a wagon, manufacturing again at 15 Blue Island Ave. in 1866-1870
Worked for John Kranz as city salesman 1877-1882
Went into business for himself 1882-1886
Retired 1886
Page 25

TALCOT, L. C. (See also TOLCOTT, D. C.?)
49 Randolph Street 1854
Page 13

TAYLOR
TAYLOR BROTHERS CO. INC.
Ad: “The Knowledge — How to do it and — The Facilities for doing it — better than ever
before has given to the Public the ****’TAYLOR-MADE” Honey comb chocolate chip. This has
been thoroughly tested and pronounced to be a chip of Unmatchable Quality — Manufactured
by the Taylor Brothers Company, Inc. Battle Creek, Michigan”
Page 205 (Ad)

TEITGEN, Gust.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

THAUER, Christian F.
City salesman for F. W. RUECKHEIM & BRO.
Began to job candies on May 1, 1883
Per context of Page 105, sold out to C. G. ENGLERT Nov. 16, 1893
Per Page 77 sold out to ENGLERT in 1903
Page 77, 105

THOMAS, Leonard H.
Began jobbing in 1874
Engaged in many real estate deals which added materially to his income
Member of the Confectionery Agents’ Union and Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
“At one time he left the business entirely and ran a meat market, selling out to Washington
SMITH 1891
Bought out by George W. SMITH
Two years later bought out one of the HARRINGTON COMPANY’S wagons August 12, 1893
Sold out to Frank ZECH August 1, 1903
Trustee of the newly formed Confectioners’ Agents’ Union 1880
Page 57, 73, 97

THOMPSON, Arthur
Bought out Charles WIGHT’S jobbing business in September and at once took prominent place
as a jobber September 1888
Bought out jobbers route from Henry C. SCHENDORF September 1888
Ex-President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
Currently a member of the finance committee for the convention and “takes quite a prominent
part in debates.”
Ad: “GIBSON, SYKES and FOWLER, McVICKER’S THEATRE BLDG. “The Five “Live Wires” of the
Jobbing Confectioners of Chicago” Give us your orders for standard and up to date
confections” (each of the five gentlemen are identified by name and address: A. THOMPSON
7041 Union Ave., H. G. GUEST 11919 S. Halsted St., Albert FAYETTE 219 Oakley Blvd., H. H.
KINNE, 248 S. St. Louis Ave., Wm. WEIS, 43 Surrey Ct.)
Page 81, 87, 102 (Ad/Group Photo of “The Five “Live Wires””)

THOMPSON, John H.
JOHN H. THOMPSON & COMPANY
Manufacturers’ Agents
Chicago, Illinois and St. Louis, Missouri
Western Distributors
TROWBRIDGE’S Original Chocolate Chips
H.L. HILDRETH’S original “Velvet”
RUBEL & ALLEGRETTI’S Chocolates
Ad: “The Original Chip is the TROWBRIDGE CHOCOLATE CHIP “Simply Delicious” Insist on having
Trowbridge’s name on every chip. Sold everywhere. Manufactured by THE TROWBRIDGE
CHOCOLATE CHIP COMPANY Boston, Mass, Meadville, Pa. JOHN H. THOMPSON & CO. Western
Distributors”
Page 80 (Ad), 186 (Ad)

THORP
THORP, HAWLEY & CO.
Ad: “The 400 Marshmallows, The kind that tell — Made only by THORP, HAWLEY & CO.”
Page 186 (Ad)

THORP, Alfred P.
ALFRED P. THORP & CO. at 8 South Jefferson Street 1861
Moved to 92 West Randolph Street (remained for 3-4 years) 1862
Page 25

THULIN
CONRATHS & THULIN created in 1882
CONRATHS soon acquired sole business
Page 75

TJARDES, John
Began as jobber in 1896 and sold out in 1897
Page 113

TOLCOTT, D. C.
Father of TOLCOTT, Lester C.
(See also TALCOT, L.C. page 13)
49 Randolph Street 1854
Moved to 67 Randolph Street 1868
“Wholesaled candies and nuts and retailed candies, nuts and fruits.
Succeeded by his son, Lester A. TOLCOTT 1868
Page 13, 15

TOLCOTT, Lester C.
Succeeded father, D. C. TOLCOTT as a manufacturer at 67 Randolph Street and remained in
business for a number of years 1860
Page 13, 15

TORMOEHLEN, Bernhardt
(Also called Bernard and Bernhard)
Son of William TORMOEHLEN and brother of Frederick C., William F., and Edward TORMOEHLEN)
Admitted to the business of his father, William TORMOEHLEN Sr. at 2808 State Street
Father retired.
Brothers separated with Fred retiring, Edward taking his place, and Bernard opening a place
at 9037 Commercial Avenue 1893
Sold out jobbing business to A. JANSEN December 15, 1896
Page 43, 99, 113

TORMOEHLEN, Edward
After retirement of father, William TORMOEHLEN Sr., formed partnership with brother,
William F. and Frederick, called TORMOEHLEN & BROS. and started business at 164 South
Desplaines Street.
Firm name changed to TORMOEHLEN BROS.
Fred retired and Edward took his place 1893
Succeeded by GEORGE & CHARLES
TORMOEHLEN BROS. separated 1893
Page 43, 99

TORMOEHLEN, Frederick C.
Son of William TORMOEHLEN
Fred retired from manufacturing 1893
Ran jobbing business for John Block’s widow finally buying it December 1900 and is still in
business 1905
10009 Avenue M
Page 43, 87, 97, 99, 117

TORMOEHLEN, William F.
Father of Bernhardt (also called “Bernard” and “Berhard”), William F., Edward and
Frederick C. TORMOEHLEN
Started business at 177 Forrest Avenue in 1877
Bought out tools and stock of C. PAPE in October 1877
Joined by son, Bernhardt and moved to 2808 State Street 1884
Retired shortly after 1884
Business assumed by sons William F., Edward and Frederick as WILLIAM F. TORMOEHLEN & BROS.
at 164 South Desplaines Street
Firm Name changed to TORMOEHLEN BROS. October 1, 1888
TORHMOEHLEN BROTHERS separated with Fred retiring, Edward taking his place and Bernard
opening place at 9037 Commercial Avenue 1893
Sold to GEORGE & CHARLES
Plant at 106 West Adams absorbed the by NATIONAL CANDY COMPANY in 1903
Edward H. SCANLAN, Jr. is handling jobbing trade of TORMOEHLEN BRANCH of the NATIONAL CANDY
COMPANY 1905
Page 43, 81, 99, 121

TREIN, Charles
Began jobbing candies (late 1880’s?) and became salesman on the road until he bough out L
FREIDMAN and formed TREIN CONFECTIONERY CO.
Discontinued Dec. 1, 1903
Began manufacturing as TREIN CONFECTIONERY CO. at 128 and 130 Orleans Avenue in 1903
Page 89,121

TRIMBLE
TRIMBLE & ALBERDING
191 and 193 South Desplaines Street
Began manufacturing in late 1880’s
L.C. ALBERDING admitted brother and firm became L.C. ALBERDING & BRO.1887
Page 81

TROWBRIDGE CHOCOLATE CHIP COMPANY
Boston, Mass and Meadville, Pa.
Ad: “The Original Chip is the TROWBRIDGE CHOCOLATE CHIP “Simply Delicious” Insist on having
Trowbridge’s name on every chip. Sold everywhere. Manufactured by THE TROWBRIDGE
CHOCOLATE CHIP COMPANY Boston, Mass, Meadville, Pa. JOHN H. THOMPSON & CO. Western
Distributors”
Page 80 (Ad), 186 (Ad)

TROWBRIDGE, R. G.
Sold out jobbing business to George E. DEXHEIMER September 1904
Page 125

URBANCK, W. M.
(Note: also spelled “URBANEK” on page 99 and 119)
Bought jobber business of John B. CURETON November 1, 1893
Succeeded in business by J. BENDA of BENDA and HYNOUS at 1184 Spaulding Avenue March 1902
(Note “HYNONS” also spelled “HYNOUS” on page 53)
Page 53, 99, 119

URBANEK, W. M.
(Note: also spelled “URBANCK” on page 53)
Bought jobber business of John B. CURETON November 1, 1893
Succeeded in business by J. BENDA of BENDA and HYNOUS at 1184 Spaulding Avenue March 1902
(Note “HYNONS” also spelled “HYNOUS” on page 53)
Page 53, 99, 119

VANDERBUSCH, H. L.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

VAN MARECK, V.
Born in Holland
Partnered with Frank PILGRIM in PILGRIM & VAN MARECK at 134 West Randolph Street January 1,
1868
Retired 1870
Page 35

VARLEY, M. S.
Publisher, 464 Ogden Avenue, Chicago
Ad: “BETTER TIMES ARE COMING BYE & BYE” This beautiful new and catchy song and also “When
the Coon Am De President”, both with words and complete full sheet Music for the Piano, for
20 cents in stamps. M .S. VARLEY, Publisher, 464 Ogden Avenue, Chicago.”
(Note: Ad quoted verbatim for its historical value, despite personal misgivings of
transcriber and sincerest apologies to those rightly offended by racist implication of song
title)
Page 178 (Ad)

VEITH, Louis
Began jobbing business in 1900
“…one of the quiet men in the business, who has a very fair trade.”
Ad: “LOUIS VEITH, 950 S. Ridgeway Ave., Jobbing Confectioner”
Page 117, 158 (Ad)

VERVERS, Joseph
Began in wholesale and manufacturing business 1893
Still in the jobbing business 1905
Page 99

VON BERNER, C.O.
Began a jobbing business 1894
Page 109

WALSH, Austin
Began with wagon in Spring 1872
Sold out to Henry G. LEUDTKE Spring 1873
Page 51

WALTER, George
Bought out jobbing business of F. D. PARMAN 1894
Page 109

WARREN, E. D.
135 Twenty-Second Street
page 51

WATERS, John
Ad: “Dealer in high grade Hard & Soft Coal :: Coke and Kindling, 1058 W. Harrison St.”
Page 135 (Ad)

WAYMAN
WAYMAN & MURPHY
Manufacturers and Dealers in Carriages, Wagons and Trucks
Randolph & Sangamon Sts.
Chicago
Repairing, Painting We make a speciality of Mfg. Candy wagons
Page 72 (Ad)

WEBER, John J.
Began jobbing in 1896
7142 South Chicago Avenue
page 113

WEBER, Max
Began jobbing confectionery products 1895
Page 109

WEBER, Peter
Bought out C. ROTH manufacturing business at 83 Blue Island Avenue Fall 1873
Became city salesman for BROOKS & HAEHNLEN until they went out of business
Started own jobbing business 1894
Continues as jobber of candies 1905
Page 53

WEBSTER, W. B.
70 State Street 1854
Page 13

WEGNER, Ludwig
Began jobbing candies December 7, 1893
Still in Business 1905
Resides in Cheltenham
Page 105

WEHNER, Albert
Another successful jobber who started out catering to the suburban trade (1893) and after
being in business about three years sold out to go into the real estate business. 1896
Page 103

WEIDERKEHR, Joseph A.
(See also WIEDERKEHR, Joseph, as spelled on page 121 and in Ad on page 158
Bought out jobbing business of George A. MACINTOSH August 1, 1893
Still engaged in business 1905
Ad: “Joseph Wiederkehr, 6102 Sangamon St., Jobbing Confectioner”
Resides at 6102 South Sangamon Street 1905
Page 67, 105, 121, 158 (Ad)

WEIDMAN, George
Began manufacturing business 1895
21 Clark Street
Page 67

WEINECKE, J. F.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

WEIS, William
WEIS, Mrs. William, 1st Vice President, Ladies Auxiliary of Chicago Jobbing Confectioners
Association when first formed March 1, 1905(Page 78 Group Photo, text 125)
Chairman, Banquet Committee, Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’ Association
On the death of Paul SASSO bought out his jobbing business May 19, 1890
Still jobbing 1905
Past President of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, delegate to the National
Association at its initial meeting, member of the banquet committee of the convention and
on the finance committee
“A good worker, interested in promoting the interests of the trade.”
Ad: “GIBSON, SYKES and FOWLER, McVICKER’S THEATRE BLDG. “The Five “Live Wires” of the
Jobbing Confectioners of Chicago” Give us your orders for standard and up to date
confections” (each of the five gentlemen are identified by name and address: A. THOMPSON
7041 Union Ave., H. G. GUEST 11919 S. Halsted St., Albert FAYETTE 219 Oakley Blvd., H. H.
KINNE, 248 S. St. Louis Ave., Wm. WEIS, 43 Surrey Ct.)
Resides at: 43 Surrey Court 1905
Page 74 (Photo), 78 (Mrs. WEIS Group Photo and page 125), 85, 91, 102 (Ad/Photo of “The
Five “Live Wires””)

WEISBAUM, Harry L.
Bought out jobbing business of Louis EHEIM 1894
Sold business back to Louis EHEIM 1895
Page 109

WENDELBURG, Henry
Sold jobbing business to Charles H. Sell at 3928 Artesian Ave. 1902
Page 121

WERRES, Anthony H. C.
Originally in bakery business
“one of the jolly men in business”
Continuing on a wagon until he sold out to take position as traveling salesman 1885
Page 63

WEST SIDE CANDY CO.
Began manufacturing at 171 South Desplaines in 1901
Page 119

WESTERN CONFECTION CO.
(See also C. S. MATHER & SON whose business per page 109 became the WESTERN CONFECTIONERY
CO.)
52-54-56-58 West Jackson Blvd.
“Uncle Cy’s Corn Wafers”
Page 52 (Ad), 109

WHITMAN, F. C.
(Note: spelled “WITTMAN” on page 69
Purchased jobbers’ route from William H. DIBBLE June 2, 1890
Bought out A. CONKLIN on June 2, 1890
Still jobbing candies 1905
Member of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association finance committee
Ad: “F. C. WITTMAN 1089 Kimball Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at: 1089 Kimball Avenue 1905
Page 69, 91, 155 (Ad)

WICHELMANN, Fred A.
WICHELMANN & ODLIN
Began manufacturing homemade candies and popcorn at 148 Dearborn Street 1864
Moved to 273 Madison Street 1868 – October 9, 1871 (Fire)
Reopened (no partner) at 277 Madison Street 1872 – 1884
Retired 1884
Page 35

WIEDERKEHR, Joseph A.
(See also WEIDERKEHR, Joseph, as spelled on pages 67, 105
Bought out jobbing business of George A. MACINTOSH August 1, 1893
Sold route for jobbing business to August MOENCH at 2902 Wentworth Avenue 1902
Still engaged in business 1905
Ad: “Joseph Wiederkehr, 6102 Sangamon St., Jobbing Confectioner”
Resides at 6102 South Sangamon Street 1905
Page 67, 105, 121, 158 (Ad)

WIGHT, Charles
Bought out route from Henry C. SCHENDORF
Sold out to Arthur THOMPSON in September 1888
Page 81, 87

WILBUR, H. O.
Ad: “WILBUR’S — For those who value quality — Wilbur’s American milk chocolate, Wilbur’s
Vanilla Chocolate Buds, Wilbur’s Sweet Clover Vanilla Chocoate, Wilbur’s Chocolate Coatings
and Liquors, H. O. WILBUR & SONS, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago”
Page 154 (Ad)

WILLEY, Herbert
Partnered with Frank FIELD and B. F. SMITH in opening bakery and candy factory at 108 West
Washington Street, under name of FRANK FIELD & CO.
Moved to 203 East Van Buren Street, corner of Franklin Street, dropped bakery to focus on
candy.
Company went into receivership and was sold to SMITH & HALE
Page 63, 65

WILLIAMS
FRITSCH & WILLIAMS
Began manufacturing 1895
209 North Wells Street
Page 67

WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN
Frederick HOFFMAN was junior member of WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN, 185 Ontario Street 1905
Ad: “WILLIAMS & HOFFMAN, Manufacturing Confectioners, 85-87 Ontario Street, Phone North
1950 – Chicago, Specialties in Marshmallow and Cream Goods”
Page 114 (Ad)

WINDSOR
HAYWORD-WINDSOR Co. a wholesale and manufacturing concern established at 161 South Canal in
September 1,1893
Business failed August 27, 1904
Page 95, 99

WINTER
WINTER & GOLDMAN
124 Dearborn Street
Started business 1878?
Page 51

WIRTH, A. F.
Mrs. A. F. Wirth was member of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Chicago Jobbing Confectioners’
Association when formed March 1, 1905.
Ad: “A. F. WIRTH, 188 Sheffield Av. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 125,134 (Ad)

WIRTH, R. C.
Began jobbing in 1896
Now jobbing candies in Racine, Wisconsin 1905
Page 113

WITTMAN, F. C.
(Note: Spelled “WHITMAN” on page 91)
Purchased jobbers’ route from William H. DIBBLE June 2, 1890
Bought out A. CONKLIN on June 2, 1890
Still jobbing candies 1905
Member of the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association finance committee
Ad: “F. C. WITTMAN, 1089 Kimball Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Resides at: 1089 Kimball Avenue 1905
Page 69, 91, 155 (Ad)

WOEHRLE, Charles
WOEHRLE, Charles Jr.
Started manufacturing candies at 115 Blue Island Avenue
Son and namesake is still jobbing candies 1905
Page 63

WOOD, N. S.
An actor, who partnered with E. F. GAVIN to manufacture candy at 145 South Clinton Street
under the firm name of E. F. GAVIN & COMPANY, on May 1, 1892.
Continued in business until it failed February 22, 1893
Page 95

WRUBLIK, W.
Began jobbing business 1894
Page 109

WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO.
Cleveland, Ohio
Ad: “We are the originators and makers of the only GENUINE ITALIAN CREAM on the market.
Flavors: Vanila, Chocolate, Orange, Peach Also the original PRINCESS KISS, A most delicious
piece of molasses candy. We also make Creameata Nut Nougat and Vanila and Chocolate Walnut
block. BEWARE OF IMITATIONS! Attempts have been and are being made to imitate our goods.
Our goods are still unequaled. The WUEST-BAUMAN-HUNT CO. Cleveland, Ohio.”
Page 139 (Ad)

YOUNG, William H.
5917 Princeton Avenue
Bought out jobber business of Gustav KOENTIZER January 5, 1903
Ad: “Wm. H. YOUNG 5917 Princeton Av. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 121, 134 (Ad)

YOUNKER, H.
Bought out John H. BOWDEN’s wagon jobber business August 13, 1874
Sold out to H. LANDIS May 1876
Page 51

ZAJICEK, Thomas
Began in jobbing business in 1902
Sold out to Steven JIRSA/JERSA January 7, 1905
Page 121, 125

ZECH, Frank
Ad: “PARMAN BROS. & ZECH, Jobbers of all the better makes of Chocolates and High Grade
Candies
2915-17 North Hermitage Avenue, Ravenswood, Illinois”
Member of PARMAN BROS. & ZECH WHICH bought out “jobber” business of Leonard H. THOMAS at
716 Winnemac August 1, 1903
“…firm PARMAN BROS. & ZECH, 2719 North Hermitage Avenue” 1905
Page 59, 80 (Ad), 109, 123

ZEESE, William
Began jobbing business at 258 Cortlandt Street in 1903
Page 123

ZENO
ZENO MFG. CO.
ZENO Chewing Gum
Chicago
Page 73 (Ad)

ZENITH
Ad: “Specialties – Fine chocolates, pail goods, penny goods — ZENITH — always the same
The Jobbers’ favorites��AMERICAN CHOCOLATE CONFECTION CO. 123-125 La Salle Av., Chicago”
Page 21 (Ad)

ZIEGLER, George
Ad: “More could be said, but what’s the use. GEO. ZIEGLER CO. Manufacturing Confectioners,
Milwaukee, Wisconsin — That’s quite enough”
Page 162 (Ad)

ZIERVOGEL, H.
Began jobbing business at 603 Turner Avenue on October 1, 1903
Ad: “H. ZIERVOGEL 603 Turner Ave. Wholesale Confectioner”
Page 123, 178 (Ad)

ZIESE, William
Ad: “Wm. ZIESE, Wholesale Confectioner, 258 Cortlandt St.”
Page 134

ZIMMERMAN, John J.
Treasurer of stock company formed under the name of M. E. PAGE Confectionery Company.
August 18, 1890
Stock company failed and went out of business August 18, 1897
Page 33

ZIMMERMAN, R. P.
Proprietor HOTEL SOMERSET
12th Street and Wabash Avenue
Ad: “One Block West of Illinois Central Depot, The best accomodations for the price in the
city. Hot and cold water in every room. Rates: 50cents, 75 cents, and $1.00 per day. All
modern conveniences. Ten minutes walk from the heart of the City.”
Page 122 (Ad)

ZUBER, Michael
Began as a jobber May, 1894
Sold out business to J. L. KOEBELIN February 1899
Page 107, 117

Contributed May 2000 by E. H. Callanan
Source: Historical Sketch of the Confectionery Trade of Chicago, by Henry G. Abbott, published by the Jobbing Confectioners’ Association, Chicago, 1905